tm2126524-3_424b5 - none - 13.9688398s
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Filed Pursuant to Rule 424(b)(5)
Registration No. 333-259199
CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE
Title of each class of securities
to be registered(1)
Amount to be
registered
Proposed maximum
offering price
per share(2)
Proposed maximum
aggregate offering
price(2)
Amount of
registration
fee(3)
Class A ordinary shares, par value US$0.0001 per share(1)
1,325,226,124
US$0.54
US$717,830,817.17
US$66,542.92
(1)
Includes securities initially offered and sold outside the United States that may be resold from time to time in the United States. Offers and sales of Class A ordinary shares outside the United States are being made pursuant to applicable law. From time to time, such Class A ordinary shares may be represented by American depositary shares, or ADSs, issuable upon deposit of the Class A ordinary shares registered hereby. The ADSs have been registered under a separate registration statement on Form F-6 (File No. 333-225594). Each such ADS represents three Class A ordinary shares.
(2)
Estimated solely for the purpose of calculating the registration fee. The proposed maximum aggregate offering price has been computed pursuant to Rule 457(c) promulgated under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and is based on the average of the high and low sales prices of the ADSs on December 7, 2021, as reported on the Nasdaq Global Select Market.
(3)
Calculated in accordance with Rules 456(b) and 457(r) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

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Prospectus Supplement
(To Prospectus dated August 31, 2021)
[MISSING IMAGE: lg_uxin-4clr.jpg]
Uxin Limited
1,325,226,124 Class A Ordinary Shares
This prospectus supplement relates to the resale from time to time by the shareholders identified in the “Selling Shareholders” section and/or their affiliates in this prospectus supplement, or the selling shareholders, of up to an aggregate of 1,325,226,124 Class A ordinary shares, par value US$0.0001 per share, which may be represented from time to time by American depositary shares, or ADSs. The maximum 1,325,226,124 Class A ordinary shares offered hereby consist of (i) an aggregate of 407,661,314 Class A ordinary shares held by certain selling shareholders, (ii) an aggregate of 480,629,186 Class A ordinary shares that may be acquired by certain selling shareholders by exercising all of their warrants to purchase from us and convert senior convertible preferred shares, (iii) an aggregate of 371,395,281 Class A ordinary shares that may be acquired by certain selling shareholders by converting the senior convertible preferred shares, calculated based on the applicable conversion price as of the date hereof and (iv) 65,540,343 Class A ordinary shares that may be acquired by certain selling shareholders and/or their affiliates by converting the senior convertible preferred shares to be acquired by them, calculated based on the applicable conversion price as of the date hereof. Each ADS represents three Class A ordinary shares. We will not receive any of the proceeds from the sale of securities by the selling shareholders.
Our ADSs are listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market, or Nasdaq, under the symbol “UXIN.” On December 6, 2021, the last reported trading price of our ADSs on Nasdaq was US$1.68 per ADS.
The selling shareholders may sell the securities from time to time at fixed prices, at market prices or at negotiated prices, to or through underwriters, to other purchasers, through agents, or through a combination of these methods. See “Plan of Distribution” beginning on page S-37 for a more complete description of the ways in which the securities may be sold.
Investing in these securities involves a high degree of risk. Furthermore, investors should be aware that there are various other risks relating to the securities, the issuer and its subsidiaries and VIEs and their subsidiaries, their business and their jurisdictions of operations which investors should familiarize themselves with before making an investment in the securities. Please carefully consider the risks discussed under “Risk Factors” in this prospectus supplement beginning on page S-17 or in our reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission that are incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement before making a decision to invest in our securities.
Investors in the securities are purchasing securities of Uxin Limited, a Cayman Islands holding company with no equity ownership in its VIEs and their subsidiaries. We conduct our operations in China through (i) our PRC subsidiaries and (ii) our VIEs and their subsidiaries with which we have maintained contractual arrangements. Because of these contractual arrangements, we are the primary beneficiary of the VIEs and hence consolidate their financial results with ours under U.S. GAAP. Investors in our ADSs thus are not purchasing equity interest in our operating entities in China but instead are purchasing equity interest in a Cayman Islands holding company. We derived 10.2%, 4.6%, 5.1% and 0.9% of our net revenues from our VIEs and their subsidiaries for the year ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, the three months ended March 31, 2020 and the year ended March 31, 2021, respectively. As used in this prospectus, “we,” “us,” “our company,” or “our,” refers to Uxin Limited, our Cayman Islands holding company, and its subsidiaries, and, in the context of describing our operations and consolidated financial information, also includes our VIEs and their subsidiaries in China.
Our corporate structure is subject to risks associated with our contractual arrangements with our VIEs. If the PRC government deems that our contractual arrangements with our VIEs do not comply with PRC regulatory restrictions on foreign investment in the relevant industries, or if these regulations or the interpretation of existing regulations change or are interpreted differently in the future, we could be subject to severe penalties or be forced to relinquish our interests in those operations. Our holding company, our PRC subsidiaries and VIEs and their subsidiaries, and investors of our company face uncertainty about potential future actions by the PRC government that could affect the enforceability of the contractual arrangements with our VIEs and, consequently, significantly affect the financial performance of our VIEs and their subsidiaries and our company as a whole. Our Class A ordinary shares or our ADSs may decline in value or become worthless, if we are unable to assert our contractual control rights over the assets of our VIEs that conduct some or all of our operations. For a detailed description of the risks associated with our corporate structure, please refer to risks disclosed under “Item 3.D. Key Information — Risk Factors — Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure” in our Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, which is incorporated by reference and “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure” in this prospectus supplement.
We face various risks and uncertainties related to doing business in China. Our business operations are primarily conducted in China, and we are subject to complex and evolving PRC laws and regulations. For example, we face risks associated with regulatory approvals on offshore offerings, anti-monopoly regulatory actions, and oversight on cybersecurity and data privacy, as well as the lack of PCAOB inspection on our auditors, which may impact our ability to conduct certain businesses, accept foreign investments, or list on a United States or other foreign exchange. These risks could result in a material adverse change in our operations and the value of our ADSs, significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors, or cause such securities to significantly decline in value or become worthless. For a detailed description of risks related to doing business in China, “Item 3.D. Key Information — Risk Factors — Risks Related to Doing Business in China” in our Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, which is incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement, and “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Doing Business in China” in this prospectus supplement.
Neither the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined that this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus is accurate or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
The date of this prospectus supplement is December 7, 2021.

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Prospectus Supplement
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You should rely only on the information contained or incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus. We have not, and the selling shareholders have not, authorized any other person to provide you with different information. If anyone provides you with different or inconsistent information, you should not rely on it. Neither the selling shareholders nor us are making an offer to sell the
 
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securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted. You should assume that the information appearing in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference is accurate only as of each of their respective dates. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since those dates. Neither this prospectus supplement nor the accompanying prospectus constitutes an offer, or an invitation on our behalf or the selling shareholders’, to subscribe for and purchase any of the Class A ordinary shares or ADSs, and may not be used for or in connection with an offer or solicitation by anyone, in any jurisdiction in which such an offer or solicitation is not authorized or to any person to whom it is unlawful to make such an offer or solicitation.
 
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ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT
This document consists of two parts. The first part is this prospectus supplement, which describes the terms of the offerings made hereby and also adds to and updates information contained in the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference into this prospectus supplement and the accompanying prospectus. The second part, the base prospectus, presents more general information. The base prospectus was included in the registration statement on Form F-3 (File No. 333-259199) that we filed with the SEC on August 31, 2021. Generally, when we refer only to the “prospectus,” we are referring to both parts combined, and when we refer to the “accompanying prospectus,” we are referring to the base prospectus as updated through incorporation by reference.
If information in this prospectus supplement differs from information in the accompanying prospectus, you should rely on the information in this prospectus supplement.
You should not consider any information in this prospectus supplement or the accompanying prospectus to be investment, legal or tax advice. You should consult your own counsel, accountants and other advisors for legal, tax, business, financial and related advice regarding the purchase of any of the securities offered by this prospectus supplement.
In this prospectus supplement, unless otherwise indicated or unless the context otherwise requires,

“ADSs” are to the American depositary shares, each of which represents three Class A ordinary shares, par value US$0.0001 each;

“Check Auto” are to our proprietary car inspection system;

“China” or “PRC” are to the People’s Republic of China, excluding, for the purpose of this prospectus supplement only, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau;

“RMB” and “Renminbi” are to the legal currency of China, which is our reporting currency;

“NPS” are to net percentages of promoters for our products and services (those who are willing to keep buying and refer us to others) against detractors (those who are not satisfied with and complain about our offerings)

“shares” or “ordinary shares” are to our Class A and Class B ordinary shares, par value US$0.0001 per share;

“US$,” “U.S. dollars,” “$,” and “dollars” are to the legal currency of the United States;

“Uxin” or “our platform” are to our platform primarily for buying and selling used cars, which primarily consisted of vehicle sales businesses under our new inventory owning model for the fiscal year of 2021;

“Our WFOEs” are to our wholly-owned subsidiaries in China;

“Our VIEs” are to our variable interest entities, which are Youxin Internet (Beijing) Information Technology Co., Ltd., and Youxin Yishouche (Beijing) Information Technology Co., Ltd.; and

“we,” “us,” “our company” and “our” are to Uxin Limited, our Cayman Islands holding company, and its subsidiaries, and its VIEs and their subsidiaries in the PRC.
Our reporting currency is RMB. Unless otherwise noted, all translations from RMB to U.S. dollars and from U.S. dollars to RMB in this prospectus supplement are made at a rate of RMB6.4566 to US$1.00, the exchange rate in effect as of June 30, 2021, as set forth in the H.10 statistical release of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. We make no representation that any RMB or U.S. dollar amounts could have been, or could be, converted into U.S. dollars or RMB, as the case may be, at any particular rate, or at all. On December 3, 2021, the exchange rate was RMB6.3758 to US$1.00.
All discrepancies in any table between the amounts identified as total amounts and the sum of the amounts listed therein are due to rounding.
 
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WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION
We are subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, and, in accordance with the Exchange Act, we file annual reports and other information with the SEC. Information we file with the SEC can be obtained over the internet at the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.
This prospectus supplement is part of a registration statement that we filed with the SEC, using a “shelf” registration process under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, relating to the securities to be offered. This prospectus supplement does not contain all of the information set forth in the registration statement, certain parts of which are omitted in accordance with the rules and regulations of the SEC. For further information with respect to Uxin Limited and our securities, reference is hereby made to the registration statement and the prospectus contained therein. The registration statement, including the exhibits thereto, may be inspected on the SEC’s website.
INCORPORATION OF CERTAIN DOCUMENTS BY REFERENCE
The SEC allows us to “incorporate by reference” the information we file with them. This means that we can disclose important information to you by referring you to those documents that are incorporated by reference into and considered part of the accompanying prospectus. Information that we file with the SEC in the future and incorporate by reference will automatically update and supersede the previously filed information. See “Incorporation of Certain Documents by Reference” in the accompanying prospectus for more information. All of the documents incorporated by reference are available at www.sec.gov under Uxin Limited, CIK number 0001729173.
Our annual report on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021 filed with the SEC on July 30, 2021 (File No. 001-38527), or our 2021 Form 20-F, and our Form 6-K furnished to the SEC on December 7, 2021, are incorporated by reference into the accompanying prospectus.
As you read the documents incorporated by reference, you may find inconsistencies in information from one document to another. If you find inconsistencies, you should rely on the statements made in the most recent document.
Copies of all documents incorporated by reference in the accompanying prospectus, other than exhibits to those documents unless such exhibits are specially incorporated by reference in the accompanying prospectus, will be provided at no cost to each person, including any beneficial owner, who receives a copy of this prospectus supplement on the written or oral request of that person made to:
Uxin Limited
1&3/F, No. 12 Beitucheng East Road, Chaoyang District,
Beijing 100029, People’s Republic of China
Tel: +86 10 5691-6765
ir@xin.com
Attention: Investor Relations Department
 
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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference contain forward-looking statements that reflect our current expectations and views of future events. These statements are made under the “safe harbor” provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. You can identify these forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “will,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “aim,” “intend, “plan,” “believe,” “estimate,” “is/are likely to,” “future,” “potential,” “continue” or other similar expressions. We have based these forward-looking statements largely on our current expectations and projections about future events and financial trends that we believe may affect our financial condition, results of operations, business strategy and financial needs. These forward-looking statements include statements relating to, among other things:

our goals and strategies;

our ability to provide customers with high-quality used cars and other related products;

our ability to provide quality services and compete effectively;

our ability to effectively manage risks, including credit risks and fraud risks;

our future business development, financial condition and results of operations;

expected changes in our revenues, costs, expenses or expenditures;

the expected growth of, and trends in, the market for our services;

our expectations regarding demand for and market acceptance of our services;

competition in our industry;

relevant government policies and regulations relating to our industry;

public health crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, MERS, SARS, H1N1 flu, H7N9 flu, and avian flu; and

general economic and business conditions in China and globally.
The forward-looking statements included in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions about our company. Our actual results of operations may differ materially from the forward-looking statements as a result of the risk factors disclosed in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference.
We would like to caution you not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, and you should read these statements in conjunction with the risk factors disclosed in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference for a more complete discussion of the risks of an investment in our securities. We operate in a rapidly evolving environment. New risks emerge from time to time and it is impossible for our management to predict all risk factors, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ from those contained in any forward-looking statement. We do not undertake any obligation to update or revise the forward-looking statements except as required under applicable law.
 
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PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT SUMMARY
This summary highlights information presented in greater detail elsewhere. This summary is not complete and does not contain all the information you should consider before investing in our Class A ordinary shares and ADSs. You should carefully read the entire prospectus before investing, including “Risk Factors,” as well as the documents incorporated by reference. See “Incorporation of Certain Documents by Reference.”
Overview
Our Business
We are a leading nationwide online used car dealer in China. As the online destination in China for consumers to buy used cars, we make it possible for consumers to choose from our nationwide selection of used cars and buy the car directly online from our platform. In September 2020, we successfully shifted to an inventory-owning model. The completion of our business model upgrade gave us better control over order flow and supply chain management, and this further strengthens our ability to maximize customer value through our dedicated approach: offering quality value-for-money used cars alongside best-in-class purchasing services.
Our mission is to enable people to buy the car of their choice. Consumers in China have been facing significant challenges when buying used cars via traditional supply chains, such as limited access to a wide selection of used cars, inconvenience in buying used cars from other cities and regions, lack of transparent and reliable information about car condition and complex transaction processes. Operated under the brand Uxin Used Car (优信二手车), our platform addresses these issues by providing consumers with a reliable and one-stop online car buying experience and enabling consumers to select from our nationwide selection of Uxin Certified used cars and access various car-related value-added products and services online throughout China.
We have transformed the used car buying experience in China through our innovative integrated online platform and offline service and fulfilment networks, which takes care of each step of the transaction process and covers the entire value chain. In the second half of 2020, we upgraded our used car transaction value chain and migrated every sales step online. Our online platform ensures that consumers have access not only to an extensive nationwide selection of used cars, but also to a wide range of value-added products and services. In addition, we engage offline third-party service providers to effectively serve consumers and fulfill the transactions made online, such as car delivery, title transfers and other after-sales services. In particular, we provide car inspection services leveraging our inspection capabilities, which allow us to collect proprietary data, images and videos of used cars and generate accurate car condition reports. This allow convenient car comparison and is crucial to consumers’ decision-making process of buying used cars online. With a significant amount of data aggregated on our platform, we are able to continue to innovate and improve our products and services to meet consumers’ varied needs. Together, our products and services provide consumers with the superior experience and peace of mind that our brand embodies. In fact, our name, Uxin (优信), translates to quality and trust in Chinese.
Our comprehensive products and services are supported by a number of critical foundations, including proprietary technology and data analytics capabilities, one-stop online services capabilities and unique online used car transaction fulfillment capabilities.
Technology and Data Analytics Capabilities:   Our patented and industry-leading car inspection system, Check Auto (查客), provides a comprehensive overview of a used car’s condition. Our AI- and big data-driven Manhattan pricing engine provides consumers with pricing insights based on each used car’s condition, as well as serving as an algorithmic foundation for determining the ranking of used cars listed on our platform according to each car’s price and performance data. In addition, based on a wealth of data we have on user behavior and used car inventory, our AI-enabled Lingxi (灵犀) intelligent recommendation system provides personalized car recommendations to consumers by analyzing their preferences, which makes it easier for them to find the car of their choice; and our AI-powered Edison intelligent user profiling system helps our customer service personnel and sales consultants better understand consumer profiles by analyzing their preferences in real time and predicting which used cars they are likely to buy, which enables us to create more effective sales strategies.
 
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One-Stop Online Services and Online Transaction Fulfillment Capabilities:   In 2020, we have upgraded and transformed the entire used car buying process and migrated every step in the sales process online. We offer online sales consulting and assistance services without the need to assign our sales consultant offline to assist in a purchase once the consumer demonstrates intention to purchase on our platform. As a result, we replaced our offline sales team with an online consulting team that delivers timely vehicle consulting services and facilitates a seamless self-service purchasing experience. In addition, we also enhanced the responsiveness and quality of our aftersales services delivered through online chat and hotlines to ensure high customer satisfaction. Our unique transaction fulfillment capabilities are empowered by our nationwide logistics and delivery network, nationwide title transfer and vehicle registration service and industry-leading warranty programs. Our nationwide logistics and delivery network ensure timely delivery of used cars to consumers. Our title transfer and vehicle registration service efficiently handles a potentially time-consuming and complex process for consumers. Our warranty programs provide consumers with comprehensive post-sale protection.
We also collaborate with various third-party partners to provide a wide range of value-added products and services on our platform, such as auto financing options and insurance products, as well as after-sales services.
In April 2021, we entered into a strategic partnership with JD.com to launch our self-operated online store for used car transactions through JD’s platform. The collaboration will provide consumers with one-stop online used car purchase solutions including used car inspection, purchasing, insurance, and aftersales services, and includes plans for joint development of data management, technology, inspection standards, and integrated supply chains in the used car business. The cooperation with JD.com will offer our customers a higher quality and more reliable used car purchasing experience than exists in the market at present.
Since we launched our online used-car-buying product and service offerings in early 2018, we have evolved from a financing-oriented platform to a transaction-centric online used car dealer who offers quality value-for-money used cars, premium purchasing services and online one-stop convenience. From 2018 when we started to provide 2C online used car transaction services to 2019, we witnessed significant growth in our business. However, as a result of the disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic to our business operations as well as our business transformation, the total number of online used car transactions completed through our 2C platform decreased by 89.9% from 97,100 in 2019 to 9,835 in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021.
To further strengthen our ability to provide used cars of high quality and value-for-money, we are building our own Inspection and Reconditioning Centers (IRCs) where we can refurbish highly selected inventory to a “like new” condition. Our first IRC in Xi’an has been in operation since March 2021. Equipped with the capacity of warehousing, exhibition, inspection and preparation, the Xi’an IRC is able to hold over 1,000 used cars and to provide services in connection with the vehicle registration and management bureau, providing consumers with a one-stop shopping experience.
We have also started to focus on improving NPS to measure the level of satisfaction for our services by our consumers.
Corporate Structure
We have entered into a series of contractual arrangements with our VIEs and their respective shareholders. These contractual arrangements enable us to:

receive the economic benefits that could potentially be significant to our VIEs in consideration for the services provided by our subsidiaries;

exercise effective control over our VIEs; and

hold an exclusive option to purchase all or part of the equity interests in our VIEs when and to the extent permitted by PRC law.
These contractual agreements include exclusive business cooperation agreements, exclusive option agreement, loan agreements, equity interest pledge agreements and powers of attorney, as the case may be. As of the date of this prospectus supplement, our WFOEs have not received any payment from our VIEs or
 
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their subsidiaries under the exclusive business cooperation agreements. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, there was no cash transferred between our VIEs and Uxin Limited or its subsidiaries. For the year ended December 31, 2018 and 2019 and the three months ended March 31, 2020, other than funds paid or received in the ordinary course of business on behalf of our PRC subsidiaries, there was no other cash movement or transfer of funds between our VIEs and Uxin Limited or its subsidiaries. For a summary of the material provisions of the contractual arrangements, please refer to “Item 4. Information on the Company — C. Organizational Structure — Contractual Arrangements with Our VIEs and their Respective Shareholders” in our 2021 Form 20-F. We derived 10.2%, 4.6%, 5.1% and 0.9% of our net revenues from our VIEs and their subsidiaries for the year ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, the three months ended March 31, 2020 and the year ended March 31, 2021, respectively. Yougu (Shanghai) Information Technology Co., Ltd., our WFOE, and Youhan (Shanghai) Information Technology Co., Ltd., the subsidiary of our WFOE, have obtained Value-Added Telecom Service license, or VATS license, to conduct E-commerce in 2015 and 2016, respectively, and have been operating our platform since then. As of the date of the prospectus supplement, we primarily conduct our operations through our subsidiaries.
We do not have any equity interests in our VIEs. However, as a result of contractual arrangements, we have effective control over and are considered the primary beneficiary of these companies, and we have consolidated the financial results of these companies in our consolidated financial statements. If our VIEs or their shareholders fail to perform their respective obligations under the contractual arrangements, we could be limited in our ability to enforce the contractual arrangements that give us effective control over our VIEs. Furthermore, if we are unable to maintain effective control, we would not be able to continue to consolidate the financial results of our VIEs and their subsidiaries in our financial statements. For a detailed description of the risks associated with our corporate structure, please refer to risks disclosed under “Item 3.D. Key Information — Risk Factors — Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure” in our 2021 Form 20-F, which is incorporated by reference and “Summary of Risk Factors — Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure” in this prospectus supplement.
Holding Company Structure
Uxin Limited is a holding company with no operations of its own. For financial information of Uxin Limited (the parent company), please refer to “Note 32. Condensed Financial Information of the Parent Company” in our 2021 Form 20-F. We conduct our operations in China primarily through our subsidiaries and VIEs and their subsidiaries in China. As a result, although other means are available for us to obtain financing at the holding company level, Uxin Limited’s ability to pay dividends to the shareholders and to service any debt it may incur may depend upon dividends paid by our PRC subsidiaries and service fees paid by our PRC VIEs and their subsidiaries. If any of our subsidiaries incurs debt on its own behalf in the future, the instruments governing such debt may restrict its ability to pay dividends to Uxin Limited. In addition, our PRC subsidiaries and VIEs and their subsidiaries are required to make appropriations to certain statutory reserve funds, which are not distributable as cash dividends except in the event of a solvent liquidation of the companies.
Our PRC subsidiaries, being foreign-invested enterprises established in China, are required to make appropriations to certain statutory reserves, namely, a general reserve fund, an enterprise expansion fund, a staff welfare fund and a bonus fund, all of which are appropriated from net profit as reported in their PRC statutory accounts. Each of our PRC subsidiaries is required to allocate at least 10% of its after-tax profits to a general reserve fund until such fund has reached 50% of its respective registered capital. Appropriations to the enterprise expansion fund and staff welfare and bonus funds are at the discretion of the board of directors of the PRC subsidiaries.
Our VIEs and their subsidiaries must make appropriations from their after-tax profits as reported in their PRC statutory accounts to non-distributable reserve funds, namely a statutory surplus fund, a statutory public welfare fund and a discretionary surplus fund. Each of our VIEs and their subsidiaries is required to allocate at least 10% of its after-tax profits to the statutory surplus fund until such fund has reached 50% of its respective registered capital. Appropriations to the statutory public welfare fund and the discretionary surplus fund are at the discretion of our VIEs and their subsidiaries.
Under PRC laws and regulations, our PRC subsidiaries and VIEs and their subsidiaries are subject to certain restrictions with respect to paying dividends or otherwise transferring any of their net assets to us.
 
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Summary of Risk Factors
An investment in our securities is subject to a number of risks, including risks relating to our business and industry, risks relating to our corporate structure, risks relating to doing business in China and risks related to our ordinary shares and ADSs. You should carefully consider all of the information in this prospectus supplement before making an investment in our securities. The following list summarizes some, but not all, of these risks. Please read the information in the section entitled “Risk Factors” for a more thorough description of these and other risks.
Risks Related to Our Business and Industry
Risks and uncertainties related to our business and industry include, but are not limited to, the following:

If we fail to provide a differentiated and superior customer experience, the size of our customer base and the number of transactions on our platform could decline, and our business would be materially and adversely affected;

Failure to maintain or enhance customer trust in us could damage our reputation, reduce or slowdown the growth of our customer base, which could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations;

Our business, operating results and financial condition have been and may continue to be adversely affected by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic;

We face intense competition, which may lead to loss of market share, reduced service fees and revenue, increased expenses, departures of qualified employees, and disputes with competitors;

We are not profitable and have negative cash flows from operations, which may continue in the future;

If we are unable to effectively manage our growth or implement our business strategies, our business, results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected;

Failure to acquire attractive inventory, whether because of supply, competition, or other factors, may have a material adverse effect on our business, sales, and results of operations;

Failure to expeditiously sell our inventory could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales, and results of operations;

We work with third-party service providers and business partners. Actions of third parties are outside of our control and could materially and adversely affect our reputation, business, financial condition and results of operations;

We rely, in part, on our marketing efforts for customer acquisition and achieving higher level of brand recognition. If we fail to conduct our marketing activities effectively and efficiently, our business could be harmed; and

We collect, process, store and use personal information and other data, and any actual or perceived failure to protect such information and data could damage our reputation and brand and harm our business and results of operations.
Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure
Risks and uncertainties related to our corporate structure include, but are not limited to, the following:

We are a Cayman Islands holding company with no equity ownership in our VIEs and we conduct our operations in China through (i) our PRC subsidiaries and (ii) our VIEs with which we have maintained contractual arrangements. Investors in our Class A ordinary shares or the ADSs thus are not purchasing equity interest in our VIEs in China but instead are purchasing equity interest in a Cayman Islands holding company. If the PRC government deems that our contractual arrangements with our VIEs do not comply with PRC regulatory restrictions on foreign investment in the relevant industries, or if these regulations or the interpretation of existing regulations change in the future, we
 
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could be subject to severe penalties or be forced to relinquish our interests in those operations. Our holding company in the Cayman Islands, our VIEs, and investors of our company face uncertainty about potential future actions by the PRC government that could affect the enforceability of the contractual arrangements with our VIEs and, consequently, significantly affect the financial performance of our VIEs and our company as a group;

We rely on contractual arrangements with our VIEs and their respective shareholders to exercise control over our business, which may not be as effective as direct ownership in providing operational control;

Any failure by our VIEs or their shareholders to perform their obligations under our contractual arrangements with them would have a material and adverse effect on our business; and

Our ability to enforce the equity pledge agreements between us and our VIEs’ shareholders may be subject to limitations based on PRC laws and regulations.
Risks Related to Doing Business in China
Risks and uncertainties related to doing business in China include, but are not limited to, the following:

Changes in China’s economic, political or social conditions or government policies could have a material and adverse effect on our business and results of operations;

The approval of the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or CSRC, or other PRC government authorities may be required in connection with our offshore offerings under PRC law, and, if required, we cannot predict whether or for how long we will be able to obtain such approval and, even if we obtain such CSRC approval, the approval could be rescinded. Any failure to obtain or delay in obtaining the CSRC approval for our offshore offerings, or a rescission of such CSRC approval if obtained by us, would subject us to sanctions imposed by the CSRC or other PRC regulatory authorities;

Uncertainties with respect to the PRC legal system could adversely affect us;

Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of Chinese laws and regulations could limit the legal protections available to us;

Our business is susceptible to changes in government policies, including policies on automobile purchases, ownership, taxation, vehicle title transfers, and used car transactions across regions and provinces. Failure to adequately respond to such changes could adversely affect our business;

You may experience difficulties in effecting service of legal process, enforcing foreign judgments or bringing actions in China against us or our management named in the annual report based on foreign laws; and

Our ADSs may be delisted or prohibited from being traded over-the-counter under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act if the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or the PCAOB is unable to inspect auditors who are located in China. The delisting or the cessation of trading of our ADSs, or the threat of their being delisted or prohibited from being traded, may materially and adversely affect the value of your investment. Additionally, the inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections deprives our investors with the benefits of such inspections.
Risks Related to Our Class A Ordinary Shares and ADSs
Risks and uncertainties related to our Class A ordinary shares and ADSs include, but are not limited to, the following:

The trading price of the ADSs is likely to be volatile, which could result in substantial losses to investors;

Our dual-class share structure with different voting rights will limit your ability to influence corporate matters and could discourage others from pursuing any change of control transactions that holders of our Class A ordinary shares and ADSs may view as beneficial;
 
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The dual-class structure of our ordinary shares may adversely affect the trading market for our ADSs;

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, or if they adversely change their recommendations regarding the ADSs, the market price for the ADSs and trading volume could decline; and

The sale or availability for sale of substantial amounts of the ADSs could adversely affect their market price.
Corporate Information
Our principal executive offices are located at 1&3/F, No. 12 Beitucheng East Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100029, People’s Republic of China. Our telephone number at this address is +86 10 5691-6765. Our registered office in the Cayman Islands is located at Maples Corporate Services Limited at P.O. Box 309, Ugland House, Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, Cayman Islands. We have appointed Cogency Global Inc., located at 122 East 42nd Street, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10168 as our agent upon whom process may be served in any action brought against us under the securities laws of the United States in connection with offerings of securities registered by the registration statement of which this prospectus supplement is a part.
The SEC maintains an internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC at www.sec.gov. You can also find information on our website at http://ir.xin.com/. The information contained on our website is not a part of this prospectus supplement.
Recent Developments
Financial Results
The following unaudited consolidated statements of comprehensive loss data for the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2021 and consolidated balance sheet data as of March 31, 2021 and June 30, 2021 have been prepared and presented in accordance with U.S. GAAP. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of results expected for future periods.
The following table presents our unaudited consolidated statements of comprehensive loss data for the periods indicated:
For the three months ended June 30,
2020
2021
RMB
RMB
US$
(in thousands, except for number of shares and per share data)
Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive
Loss:
Revenues
Retail vehicle sales
91,745 14,209
Wholesale vehicle sales
176,591 27,350
Commission revenue
28,582
Value-added service revenue
23,131
Others
10,515 9,482 1,469
Total revenues
62,228 277,818 43,028
Cost of revenues
(79,912) (266,689) (41,305)
Gross (loss)/ profit
(17,684) 11,129 1,723
Operating expenses
Sales and marketing
(115,750) (42,159) (6,530)
General and administrative
(86,898) (38,347) (5,939)
Research and development
(22,805) (8,338) (1,291)
Provision for credit losses, net
74,022 5,476 848
Total operating expenses
(151,431) (83,368) (12,912)
 
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For the three months ended June 30,
2020
2021
RMB
RMB
US$
(in thousands, except for number of shares and per share data)
Other operating income
40,752 21,542 3,336
Loss from continuing operations
(128,363) (50,697) (7,853)
Interest income
1,136 3,045 472
Interest expenses
(28,969) (18,389) (2,848)
Other income
1,897 1,114 173
Other expenses
(4,097) (818) (127)
Foreign exchange gains/(losses)
274 (3,723) (577)
Loss from continuing operations before income tax expense
(158,122) (69,468) (10,760)
Income tax (expense)/ benefit
(32)
Equity in income of affiliates
5,754 276 43
Net loss from continuing operations, net of tax
(152,400) (69,192) (10,717)
Less: net loss attributable to non-controlling interests
shareholders
(5)
Net loss from continuing operations, attributable to UXIN LIMITED’s ordinary shareholders
(152,395) (69,192) (10,717)
Discontinued operations
Net income from discontinued operations before income tax (including a net disposal gain of RMB721,211 for the three months ended June 30, 2020)
295,744
Net income from discontinued operations attributable to UXIN LIMITED’s ordinary shareholders
295,744
Net income/(loss)
143,344 (69,192) (10,717)
Less: net loss attributable to non-controlling interests
shareholders
(5)
Net income/(loss) attributable to UXIN LIMITED’s ordinary shareholders
143,349 (69,192) (10,717)
Net income/(loss)
143,344 (69,192) (10,717)
Foreign currency translation
1,687 24,870 3,852
Total comprehensive income/(loss)
145,031 (44,322) (6,865)
Less: total comprehensive loss attributable to non-controlling interests shareholders
(5)
Total comprehensive income/(loss) attributable to UXIN LIMITED’s ordinary shareholders
145,036 (44,322) (6,865)
Net income/(loss) attributable to UXIN LIMITED’s ordinary shareholders
143,349 (69,192) (10,717)
Weighted average shares outstanding – basic
891,184,665 1,116,946,693 1,116,946,693
Weighted average shares outstanding – diluted
1,179,129,118 1,116,946,693 1,116,946,693
(Loss)/earnings per share for ordinary shareholders, basic
Continuing operations
(0.17) (0.06) (0.01)
Discontinued operations
0.33
(Loss)/earnings per share for ordinary shareholders, diluted
Continuing operations
(0.17) (0.06) (0.01)
Discontinued operations
0.27
 
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The following table presents our unaudited consolidated balance sheet data for the periods indicated:
As of March 31,
As of June 30,
2021
2021
RMB
RMB
US$
Unaudited Consolidated Balance Sheets
(in thousands, except for number of shares and per share data)
ASSETS
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents
192,605 123,985 19,203
Restricted cash
41,114 42,653 6,606
Accounts receivable, net
2,446 2,615 406
Amounts due from related parties, net of provision for credit losses of RMB6,456 as of March 31, 2021 and June 30, 2021(i)
129,383 125,566 19,448
Loan recognized as a result of payment under the guarantee, net of provision for credit losses of RMB1,182,609 and RMB748,718 as of March 31, 2021 and June 30, 2021, respectively
179,947 138,594 21,465
Other receivables, net of provision for credit losses of RMB20,980 and RMB18,430 as of March 31, 2021 and June 30, 2021, respectively
110,025 118,235 18,312
Inventory, net
69,587 97,081 15,036
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
107,836 102,530 15,880
Total current assets
832,943 751,259 116,356
Non-current assets
Property, equipment and software, net
29,306 26,714 4,137
Intangible assets, net
27 17 3
Long term investments
288,428 288,704 44,715
Other non-current assets(ii)
36,000 33,000 5,111
Right-of-use assets, net
46,829 45,076 6,981
Total non-current assets
400,590 393,511 60,947
Total assets
1,233,533 1,144,770 177,303
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT
Current liabilities
Short-term borrowings and current portion of long-term borrowings
79,560 68,684 10,638
Accounts payable
101,205 96,661 14,971
Guarantee liabilities
2,441 1,811 280
Other payables and other current liabilities(iii)
788,303 693,658 107,434
Deferred revenue
23,296 21,267 3,294
Convertible notes, current(iv)
1,598,176 247,526
Amounts due to related parties(v)
69,434 69,434 10,754
Operating lease liabilities, current
11,657 10,733 1,662
Consideration payment to WeBank, current(vi)
71,309 72,159 11,176
Total current liabilities
1,147,205 2,632,583 407,735
 
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As of March 31,
As of June 30,
2021
2021
RMB
RMB
US$
Unaudited Consolidated Balance Sheets
(in thousands, except for number of shares and per share
data)
Non-current liabilities
Long-term borrowings
233,000 233,000 36,087
Convertible notes, non-current(iv)
1,614,040
Operating lease liabilities, non-current
34,365 35,111 5,438
Consideration payment to WeBank, non-current(vi)
200,778 162,046 25,098
Other non-current liabilities(vii)
103,319 16,002
Total non-current liabilities
2,082,183 533,476 82,625
Total liabilities
3,229,388 3,166,059 490,360
Shareholders’ deficit
Ordinary shares
733 737 114
Additional paid-in capital
13,695,877 13,714,761 2,124,146
Accumulated other comprehensive income
217,747 242,617 37,577
Accumulated deficit
(15,910,049) (15,979,241) (2,474,869)
Total Uxin’s shareholders’ deficit
(1,995,692) (2,021,126) (313,032)
Non-controlling interests
(163) (163) (25)
Total shareholders’ deficit
(1,995,855) (2,021,289) (313,057)
Total liabilities and shareholders’ deficit
1,233,533 1,144,770 177,303
(i)
Amounts due from related parties mainly represented the consideration receivables from 58.com due to the divestiture of B2B online used car auction business in April 2020.
(ii)
Other non-current assets represented our prepayment for financial solution advisory services. We entered into a long-term strategic cooperation agreement with Golden Pacer separately in April 2020, and an aggregate amount of RMB60.0 million as prepayment was made in exchange for a 5-year financial solution advisory services from Golden Pacer.
(iii)
Other payables and other current liabilities included a total of RMB 129.2 million (US$ 20 million) prepayment for the subscription of senior convertible preferred shares from Joy Capital on June 25, 2021. Although the underlying share certificates for the senior convertible preferred shares were issued on the same day, the certificate of designation of senior convertible preferred shares was dated on July 12, 2021, the first closing date of the transaction with Joy Capital and NIO Capital. Therefore, we recorded the amount received as other current liabilities as of June 30, 2021.
(iv)
Pursuant to the convertible note purchase agreement we entered into with affiliates of 58.com, Warburg Pincus, TPG and certain other investors on May 28, 2019, early redemption is permitted if requested by holders three years after June 9, 2019. As of June 30, 2021, all convertible notes, non-current were reclassified into convertible notes, current. Subsequently, they converted their convertible notes in an aggregate principal amount of US$69 million into our 66,990,291 Class A ordinary shares on July 12, 2021, and the remaining principal amounts will be repaid in four instalments schedule.
(v)
Amounts due to related parties mainly represented the advertising and marketing expenses payable to 58.com.
(vi)
On July 23, 2020, we entered into a supplemental agreement with WeBank to settle our remaining guarantee liabilities associated with the historically-facilitated loans for WeBank. Pursuant to the supplemental agreement, we will pay an aggregate amount of RMB372 million to WeBank from 2020 to 2025 as guarantee settlement with a maximum annual settlement amount of no more than RMB84 million. Upon the signing of the supplemental agreement, we are also no longer subject to
 
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guarantee obligations in relation to our historically-facilitated loans for WeBank under the condition that we make the instalment payments based on the agreed-upon schedule set forth in the supplemental agreement.
On June 21, 2021, we entered into another supplemental agreement with WeBank and under this supplemental agreement a total of RMB 48 million instalment payments will be waived (represents present value of RMB 42.2 million) immediately upon the effectiveness of this supplemental agreement. The effectiveness of this supplemental agreement is conditioned on the closing of the first tranche of financing with NIO Capital and Joy Capital. The first tranche of financing closed on July 12, 2021 and therefore this supplemental agreement became effective on July 12, 2021.
(vii)
Pursuant to a contractual payment schedule contained in a supplemental agreement signed with one of our suppliers, in order to settle all payables due to this supplier, as long as we make payments on schedule, a total of RMB56.1 million, recorded as other non-current liabilities of June 30, 2021, will be waived after full payment is made by us. The last payment of RMB 50 million will be made on December 31, 2022, and therefore, classified as other non-current liabilities. Additionally, we also entered into other supplemental agreements with two other suppliers to settle payables due to them. Total amount of RMB 16.0 million, recorded as other payables and other current liabilities of June 30, 2021, will be waived after all instalments pursuant to contractual payment schedules contained in the supplemental agreements are made by us.
*
Share-based compensation charges from continuing operations included are as follows:
For the three months ended June 30,
2020
2021
RMB
RMB
US$
(in thousands)
Cost of revenues
2,142
Sales and marketing
5,056
General and administrative
(10,752) 6,142 951
Research and development
(1,121)
Liquidity
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a general slowdown in economic activity, and the weakened consumer confidence and spending power resulted in a relatively slow recovery in transaction volumes. These factors have materially and adversely affected our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. Although China’s economy has been gradually recovering in the past few months, and the used car market has been slowly picking up since April 2020 as the industry’s infrastructure and supply chain started to resume operations, the impact of the pandemic may continue to create significant challenges and uncertainties for the market environment as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve and its full impact will still depend on future developments.
In response to the current economic situation, we have taken actions to improve our liquidity and cash position. As disclosed in the earnings release for the quarter ended June 30, 2020, we entered into a modified supplemental agreement in July 2020 with a financing partner to settle our remaining guarantee liabilities associated with historically facilitated loans. Under the modified supplemental agreement, we are able to settle our obligations by making installment payments through to 2025, which will reduce our cash outflow commitments over the next few years.
On June 14, 2021, we entered into definitive agreements with NIO Capital and Joy Capital, pursuant to which both investors have agreed to invest a total of up to US$315 million. The first tranche of this financing transaction was completed on July 12, 2021 and we have issued a total of 291,290,416 senior convertible preferred shares, equivalent to 97,096,805 ADSs to NIO Capital and Joy Capital for an aggregate amount of US$100 million. Concurrently, we have agreed with our convertible notes holders, including 58.com, TPG and Warburg Pincus, to convert their convertible notes in an aggregate principal amount of US$69 million
 
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into 66,990,291 Class A ordinary shares. On July 12, 2021, the conversion was completed and the related Class A ordinary shares were issued.
In addition, we entered into operating payables waiver agreements with several suppliers in May and June 2021, pursuant to which we will be exempted from the repayment of other payables of approximately RMB120.4 million.
Looking forward, we continue to control its cash outflows by decreasing overall costs and expenses through the upgrade of our used car transaction process and the migration of our sales channel completely online, as well as streamlining our business operations with stringent cost control measures.
Considering all the actions mentioned above, we believe that our current cash and cash equivalents, cash considerations received from recent financing transactions and the anticipated cash flows from operations will be sufficient to meet our anticipated working capital requirements for at least the next twelve months of operations.
Enter into Strategic Partnership
We and Changfeng County Government of Hefei City have entered into a strategic partnership to jointly invest in and build a used car inspection and reconditioning plant. With a total investment of up to RMB2.5 billion, the plant is expected to have an annual production capacity of 60,000 to 100,000 vehicles once it is in operation in the next few years. This production capacity is expected to provide us with a stable and large supply of high quality used vehicles in the coming years.
Appointment of Chief Strategy Officer
We appointed Mr. Wenbing Jing, who is our long-time partner and a leading expert in the used car industry, as our Chief Strategy Officer in November 2021. Mr. Wenbing Jing has extensive experience in strategy and operation management. Prior to re-joining Uxin, Mr. Jing served as vice president and the general manager of the used car department at Autohome Inc. (NASDAQ: ATHM). Prior to that, Mr. Jing had served various roles at Uxin from 2011 to 2019, including general manager of Uxin’s southern division, and executive president and chief strategy officer of Uxin. Mr. Jing received his master of laws from the school of law of Cardiff University in the United Kingdom.
Closing of Second Tranche of Financing for US$27.5 million
On November 19, 2021 we announced the closing of the second tranche of our financing transaction of up to US$315 million announced on June 15, 2021 (the “Transaction”). Pursuant to the Transaction, NIO Capital and Joy Capital may proceed with the second closing to subscribe for senior convertible preferred shares for an aggregate amount of US$50 million within 12 months following the first closing, which took place in July 2021. We have completed the second closing of US$27.5 million first in November 2021, earlier than expected, through the issuance of a total of 80,104,865 senior convertible preferred shares. NIO Capital and Joy Capital still retain their rights to purchase the senior convertible preferred shares for the remaining amount of US$22.5 million. In addition, Joy Capital agreed to lend us RMB equivalent to US$17.5 million, free of interest, which is due at the same time as Joy Capital exercises its right to purchase the remaining amount of US$17.5 million in connection with this Transaction.
Recent Regulatory Developments
On July 10, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China, or the CAC, published the Measures for Cybersecurity Review (Revised Draft for Comments), or the Revised Draft, which will replace the current Measures for Cybersecurity Review after it is adopted and becomes effective. The Revised Draft, among others, stipulates that if an operator has personal information of over one million users and intends to be listed in a foreign country, it must be subject to the cybersecurity review. On November 14, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China released the Regulations on the Network Data Security (Draft for Comments), or the draft Regulations, and will accept public comments until December 13, 2021. The draft Regulations provide that data processors refer to individuals or organizations that autonomously determine the purpose and the manner of processing data. If a data processor that processes personal data of more
 
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than one million users would like to list overseas, it shall apply for a cybersecurity review according to the draft Regulations. Besides, data processors that are listed overseas shall carry out an annual data security assessment.
As advised by our PRC legal counsel, the Revised Draft and the draft Regulations were released for public comment only, and its provisions and anticipated adoption or effective date may be subject to change and thus its interpretation and implementation remain substantially uncertain. The Revised Draft and the draft Regulations remain unclear on whether the relevant requirements will be applicable to companies that have been listed in the United States and intend to conduct further equity or debt offerings, such as us. We cannot predict the impact of the Revised Draft and the draft Regulations, if any, at this stage, and we will closely monitor and assess any development in the rule-making process.
On July 30, 2021, to ensure the security of critical information and maintain network security, the State Council published the Critical Information Infrastructure Security Protection Regulations in accordance with the Data Security Law of the People’s Republic of China, which took effect on September 1, 2021. This Regulation emphasizes that operators should take technical protection measures and other necessary measures to respond to cybersecurity incidents, ensure the safe and stable operation of critical information infrastructure, and maintain the integrity, confidentiality and availability of data. As this regulation has only taken effect recently, we are currently unable to estimate its specific impact on our business, results of operations and prospects. We cannot assure you that our business operations comply with such regulations and authorities’ requirements in all respects. Any failure or perceived failure by us to comply such regulations may result in governmental investigations or enforcement actions or penalties against us and could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations. See “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Our Business and Industry — We collect, process, store, and use personal information and other data, and any actual or perceived failure to protect such information and data could damage our reputation and brand and harm our business and results of operations.”
Under the current Measures for Cybersecurity Review and other PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations, as well as the Revised Draft, critical information infrastructure operators that intend to purchase internet products and services that affect or may affect national security must be subject to the cybersecurity review. As advised by our PRC legal counsel, the exact scope of “critical information infrastructure operators” under the Revised Draft and the current regulatory regime remains unclear, and the PRC government authorities may have wide discretion in the interpretation and enforcement of these laws. In addition, the Revised Draft also stipulates that any data processor carrying out data processing activities that affect or may affect national security should also be subject to the cybersecurity review. Currently, the Revised Draft has not directly affected our business and operations, but in anticipation of the strengthened implementation of cybersecurity laws and regulations and the continued expansion of our business, we face potential risks if we are deemed as a critical information infrastructure operator under the PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations. In such case, we must fulfill certain obligations as required under the PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations, including, among others, storing personal information and important data collected and produced within the PRC territory during our operations in China, which we have fulfilled in our business, and we may be subject to review when purchasing internet products and services. If a final version of the Revised Draft is adopted, we may be subject to review when conducting data processing activities, and may face challenges in addressing its requirements and make necessary changes to our internal policies and practices in data processing. The Information and Communication Administration of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology issued a notice on August 18, 2021 (the “Notice”), requiring 43 apps, including our app to rectify on non-compliance with data collection and usage regarding users’ contact list and location data. The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology requires us to complete the rectification before August 25. We have refined our data collection and usage policy and submitted a written report within the prescribed time-frame to show rectification we had adopted as required under the Notice.
The Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress promulgated the Personal Information Protection Law of the People’s Republic of China, or the Personal Information Protection Law, on August 20, 2021, which will enter into force on November 1, 2021. According to the Personal Information Protection Law, personal information refers to all kinds of information, recorded by electronic or other means, that is related to identified or identifiable natural persons, but excludes anonymized information. Personal
 
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information handling should follow the principles of legality, rightness, necessity, and integrity. Moreover, the Personal Information Protection Law specifies the rules for handling sensitive personal information, which refers to personal information that, once leaked or illegally used, may easily cause harm to the dignity of natural persons or cause grave harm to personal or property security, including biometric characteristics, financial accounts, individual location tracking, and personal information of minors under the age of 14, among others. Personal information handlers shall bear the responsibility for their personal information handling activities, and adopt necessary measures to safeguard the personal information they handle. Otherwise, the personal information handlers will be ordered to correct their behaviors, or suspend or terminate the provision of services, and may be subject to confiscation of illegal income, fines or other penalties.
On July 6, 2021, the relevant PRC government authorities made public the Opinions on Strictly Cracking Down Illegal Securities Activities in Accordance with the Law. These opinions emphasized the need to strengthen the administration over illegal securities activities and the supervision on overseas listings by China-based companies and proposed to take effective measures, such as promoting the construction of relevant regulatory systems to deal with the risks and incidents faced by China-based overseas-listed companies. As these opinions were recently issued, official guidance and related implementation rules have not been issued yet and the interpretation of these opinions remains unclear at this stage. As such, we cannot assure you that additional requirements relating to approval from the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or the CSRC, or other regulatory authorities or other procedures will not be imposed on us, in connection with this offering or other further offerings of securities. Nor can we assure you that any new rules or regulations promulgated in the future will not impose additional requirements on us. If it is determined in the future that approval from the CSRC or other regulatory authorities or other procedures are required for this offering, it is uncertain whether we can or how long it will take us to obtain such approval or complete such procedures and any such approval or completion could be rescinded. See “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Doing Business in China — Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of Chinese laws and regulations could limit the legal protections available to us.” As of the date of this prospectus supplement, we have not received any inquiry, notice, warning, or sanctions regarding offshore offering from the CSRC or any other PRC government authorities.
 
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RISK FACTORS
Any investment in our Class A ordinary shares and ADSs involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risk factors set forth below together with the other information contained in this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference, before deciding whether to purchase the Class A ordinary shares and ADSs. Any of the following risks and the risks described in our 2021 Form 20-F, and additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or those we currently view to be immaterial, may also materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations. In such case, you may lose all or part of your original investment.
Risks Related to Our Business and Industry
We collect, process, store, and use personal information and other data, and any actual or perceived failure to protect such information and data could damage our reputation and brand and harm our business and results of operations.
We collect, process, store, and use personal information and other data provided by consumers and our business partners. Although we have spent significant resources to protect our user and transaction data against security breaches, our internal control mechanism may not be sufficient and our security measures may be compromised. Any failure or perceived failure to maintain the security of personal and other data that are provided to or collected by us could harm our reputation and brand and may expose us to legal proceedings and potential liabilities, any of which could adversely affect our business and results of operations.
There are numerous laws and regulations regarding privacy and the collection, processing, storing, sharing, disclosing, using and protecting of personal information and other data. Specifically, personally identifiable and other confidential information is increasingly subject to legislation and regulations in numerous domestic and international jurisdictions. The regulatory framework for privacy protection in China and worldwide is currently evolving and is likely to remain uncertain for the foreseeable future. We could be adversely affected if legislation or regulations in China are expanded to require changes in business practices or privacy policies, or if the PRC governmental authorities interpret or implement their legislation or regulations in ways that negatively affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. In November 2016, the Standing Committee of the NPC released the Cyber Security Law, which took effect in June 2017. The Cyber Security Law requires network operators to perform certain functions related to internet security protection and the strengthening of network information management. For instance, under the Cyber Security Law, network operators of key information infrastructure generally shall, during their operations in the PRC, store the personal information and important data collected and produced within the territory of the PRC and their purchase of network products and services that may affect national securities shall be subject to national cybersecurity review. See “Item 4.B. Information on the Company — Business Overview — Regulation — Regulations on Information Security and Privacy Protection” of our 2021 Form 20-F, originally filed with the SEC on July 30, 2021. We strive to comply with applicable laws, regulations, policies, and legal obligations relating to privacy and data protection, to the extent possible. However, it is possible that these obligations may be interpreted and applied in new or inconsistent ways and may conflict with other rules or our practices, or that new regulations may be enacted. Any failure or perceived failure by us to comply with our privacy policies, privacy-related obligations to consumers or other third parties or other privacy-related legal obligations, or any compromise of security that results in the unauthorized release or transfer of sensitive information, such as personally identifiable information or other customer data, may result in governmental enforcement actions, litigation or public statements against us by consumer advocacy groups or others and could cause consumers and our business partners to lose trust in us, which could have an adverse effect on our business. Additionally, if third parties that we work with violate applicable laws or our policies, such violations may also put our customers’ information at risk and could in turn harm our reputation, business and results of operations. In addition, the State Administration for Market Regulation and the Standardization Administration jointly issued the new Standard of Information Security Technology — Personal Information Security Specification (GB/T 35273-2020) in March 2020, which replaced the previous standard GB/T 35273-2017 and took effect from October 2020. Pursuant to this standard, personal data controllers refer to entities or persons who are authorized to determine the purposes and methods for using and processing personal information. Such personal data controller should collect
 
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information in accordance with the principles of legality, minimization and voluntariness and should also obtain a consent from the information provider. We expect that these areas will receive greater and continued attention and scrutiny from regulators and the public going forward, which could increase our compliance costs and subject us to heightened risks and challenges associated with data security and protection. For the further purposes of regulating data processing activities, safeguarding data security, promoting data development and utilization, protecting the lawful rights and interests of individuals and organizations, and maintaining national sovereignty, security, and development interests, on June 10, 2021, Standing Committee of the PRC National People’s Congress published the Data Security Law of the People’s Republic of China, which took effect on September 1, 2021. The Data Security Law requires data processing, which includes the collection, storage, use, processing, transmission, provision, publication of data, to be conducted in a legitimate and proper manner. The Data Security Law also introduces a data classification and hierarchical protection system based on the importance of data in economic and social development, and the degree of harm it may cause to national security, public interests, or legitimate rights and interests of individuals or organizations if such data are tampered with, destroyed, leaked, illegally acquired or illegally used. The appropriate level of protection measures is required to be taken for each respective category of data. Moreover, the Data Security Law provides a national security review procedure for those data activities which may affect national security and imposes export restrictions on certain data and information.
On July 10, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China, or the CAC, published the Measures for Cybersecurity Review (Revised Draft for Comments), or the Revised Draft, which will replace the current Measures for Cybersecurity Review after it is adopted and becomes effective. The Revised Draft, among others, stipulates that if an operator has personal information of over one million users and intends to be listed in a foreign country, it must be subject to the cybersecurity review. As advised by our PRC legal counsel, the Revised Draft was released for public comment only, and its provisions and anticipated adoption or effective date may be subject to change and thus its interpretation and implementation remain substantially uncertain. The Revised Draft remains unclear on whether the relevant requirements will be applicable to companies that have been listed in the United States and intend to conduct further equity or debt offerings, such as us. We cannot predict the impact of the Revised Draft, if any, at this stage, and we will closely monitor and assess any development in the rule-making process. On July 30, 2021, to ensure the security of critical information and maintain network security, the State Council published the Critical Information Infrastructure Security Protection Regulations in accordance with the Data Security Law of the People’s Republic of China, which took effect on September 1, 2021. This Regulation emphasizes that operators should take technical protection measures and other necessary measures to respond to cybersecurity incidents, ensure the safe and stable operation of critical information infrastructure, and maintain the integrity, confidentiality and availability of data. As this regulation has only taken effect recently, we are currently unable to estimate its specific impact on our business, results of operations and prospects. We cannot assure you that our business operations comply with such regulations and authorities’ requirements in all respects. Any failure or perceived failure by us to comply such regulations may result in governmental investigations or enforcement actions or penalties against us and could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
Under the current Measures for Cybersecurity Review and other PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations, as well as the Revised Draft, critical information infrastructure operators that intend to purchase internet products and services that affect or may affect national security must be subject to the cybersecurity review. As advised by our PRC legal counsel, the exact scope of “critical information infrastructure operators” under the Revised Draft and the current regulatory regime remains unclear, and the PRC government authorities may have wide discretion in the interpretation and enforcement of these laws. In addition, the Revised Draft also stipulates that any data processor carrying out data processing activities that affect or may affect national security should also be subject to the cybersecurity review. On November 14, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China released the Regulations on the Network Data Security (Draft for Comments), or the draft Regulations, and will accept public comments until December 13, 2021. The draft Regulations provide that data processors refer to individuals or organizations that autonomously determine the purpose and the manner of processing data. If a data processor that processes personal data of more than one million users would like to list overseas, it shall apply for a cybersecurity review according to the draft Regulations. Besides, data processors that are listed overseas shall carry out an annual data security assessment. Currently, the Revised Draft and the draft Regulations have not directly affected our business and operations, but in anticipation of the strengthened implementation of
 
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cybersecurity laws and regulations and the continued expansion of our business, we face potential risks if we are deemed as a critical information infrastructure operator under the PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations. In such case, we must fulfill certain obligations as required under the PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations, including, among others, storing personal information and important data collected and produced within the PRC territory during our operations in China, which we have fulfilled in our business, and we may be subject to review when purchasing internet products and services. If a final version of the Revised Draft or draft Regulations is adopted, we may be subject to review when conducting data processing activities and annual data security assessment and may face challenges in addressing its requirements and make necessary changes to our internal policies and practices in data processing. Based on the foregoing, our PRC legal counsel do not expect that, as of the date of this prospectus supplement, the current applicable PRC laws on cybersecurity would have a material adverse impact on our business.
On August 20, 2021, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of China promulgated the Personal Information Protection Law, which integrates the scattered rules with respect to personal information rights and privacy protection and took effect on November 1, 2021. Our mobile apps and websites only collect basic user personal information that is necessary to provide the corresponding services. We do not collect any sensitive personal information or other excessive personal information that is not related to the corresponding services. We update our privacy policies from time to time to meet the latest regulatory requirements of Cyberspace Administration of China and other authorities and adopt technical measures to protect data and ensure cybersecurity in a systematic way. Nonetheless, the Personal Information Protection Law raises the protection requirements for processing personal information, and many specific requirements of the Personal Information Protection Law remain to be clarified by the Cyberspace Administration of China, other regulatory authorities, and courts in practice. We may be required to make further adjustments to our business practices to comply with the personal information protection laws and regulations.
Despite our efforts to comply with applicable laws, regulations and other obligations relating to privacy, data protection and information security, we cannot assure you that we will be compliant with such new regulations in all respects. The Information and Communication Administration of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology issued a notice on August 18, 2021 (the “Notice”), requiring 43 apps, including our app to rectify on non-compliance with data collection and usage regarding users’ contact list and location data. The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology requires us to complete the rectification before August 25. We have refined our data collection and usage policy and submitted a written report within the prescribed time-frame to show rectification we had adopted as required under the Notice. As laws and regulations in China on the protection of privacy and data are constantly evolving, complying with new laws and regulations could cause us to incur substantial costs or require us to change our business practices in a manner materially adverse to our business. Any failure to comply with such laws and regulations may result in the suspension of our relevant businesses, the take-down of our operating applications, or subject us to other penalties, which may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
In addition to laws and regulations, other applicable rules regarding privacy and privacy advocacy, industry associations or other private parties may propose new and different privacy standards. Because the interpretation and application of privacy and data protection laws and privacy standards are still uncertain, it is possible that these laws or privacy standards may be interpreted and applied in a manner that is inconsistent with our practices. Any inability to adequately address privacy concerns, even if unfounded, or to comply with applicable privacy or data protection laws, regulations and privacy standards, could result in additional cost and liability to us, damage our reputation, inhibit the use of our platform and harm our business.
Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure
If thePRC government finds that the agreements that establish the structure for operating some of our operations in China do not comply with PRC regulations relating to the relevant industries, or if these regulations or the interpretation of existing regulations change in the future, we could be subject to penalties or be forced to relinquish our interests in those operations.
We are a Cayman Islands exempted company and our PRC subsidiaries are currently considered foreign-invested enterprises. Currently, our main websites are operated and our main business are run by our wholly-foreign-owned enterprises, or WFOEs, while our VIEs hold the title of a number of intellectual properties,
 
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operate certain of our websites and conduct certain of our business. Our WFOEs have entered into a series of contractual arrangements with our VIEs and their respective shareholders, respectively, which enable us to (i) exercise effective control over our VIEs, (ii) receive substantially all of the economic benefits of our VIEs, and (iii) have an exclusive option to purchase all or part of the equity interests and assets in our VIEs when and to the extent permitted by PRC law. As a result of these contractual arrangements, we have control over and are the primary beneficiary of our VIEs and hence consolidate their financial results under U.S. GAAP. See “Item 4. Information on the Company — C. Organizational Structure” of our annual report on Form 20-F for our fiscal year ended March 31, 2021 for further details. Other than investment in VIEs and our subsidiaries, no other significant assets or liabilities are held or borne by our WFOEs.
In the opinion of Beijing Docvit Law Firm, our PRC legal counsel, (i) the ownership structures of our VIEs in China and our WFOEs that have entered into contractual arrangements with the VIEs, comply with all existing PRC laws and regulations; and (ii) the contractual arrangements between our WFOEs, the VIEs and their respective shareholders governed by PRC law are valid, binding and enforceable, and will not result in any violation of PRC laws or regulations currently in effect. However, our PRC legal counsel has also advised us that there is substantial uncertainty regarding the interpretation and application of current and future PRC laws, regulations and rules; accordingly, the PRC regulatory authorities may take a view that is contrary to the opinion of our PRC legal counsel. It is uncertain whether any new PRC laws or regulations relating to variable interest entity structures will be adopted or if adopted, what they would provide. If we or any of our VIEs are found to be in violation of any existing or future PRC laws or regulations, or fail to obtain or maintain any of the required permits or approvals, the relevant PRC regulatory authorities would have broad discretion to take action in dealing with such violations or failures, including:

revoking the business licenses and other licenses and permits of our VIEs;

discontinuing or placing restrictions or onerous conditions on our operation through any transactions between our WFOEs and our VIEs;

imposing fines, confiscating the income from our WFOEs or our VIEs, or imposing other requirements with which we or our VIEs may not be able to comply;

requiring us to restructure our ownership structure or operations, including terminating the contractual arrangements with our VIEs and deregistering the equity pledges of our VIEs, which in turn would affect our ability to consolidate, derive economic interests from, or exert effective control over our VIEs;

restricting or prohibiting our use of the proceeds of our initial public offering and the concurrent

taking other regulatory or enforcement actions that could be harmful to our business.
The imposition of any of these penalties would result in adverse effect on our ability to conduct certain part of our business. In addition, it is unclear what impact the PRC government actions would have on us and on our ability to consolidate the financial results of our VIEs in our consolidated financial statements, if the PRC government authorities were to find our legal structure and contractual arrangements to be in violation of PRC laws and regulations. If the imposition of any of these government actions causes us to lose our right to direct the activities of our VIEs or our right to receive substantially all the economic benefits and residual returns from our VIEs and we are not able to restructure our ownership structure and operations in a satisfactory manner, we would no longer be able to consolidate the financial results of our VIEs in our consolidated financial statements. Either of these results, or any other significant penalties that might be imposed on us in this event, would have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.
We rely on contractual arrangements with our VIEs and their respective shareholders to exercise control over our business, which may not be as effective as direct ownership in providing operational control.
We have entered into contractual arrangements with our VIEs and their shareholders to conduct certain aspects of our businesses. These contractual arrangements may not be as effective as direct ownership in providing us with control over our VIEs. For example, our VIEs and their shareholders could breach their contractual arrangements with us by, among other things, failing to conduct its operations in an acceptable manner or taking other actions that are detrimental to our interests.
 
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If we had direct ownership of our VIEs, we would be able to exercise our rights as a shareholder to effect changes in the board of directors of our VIEs, which in turn could implement changes, subject to any applicable fiduciary obligations, at the management and operational level. However, under the current contractual arrangements, we rely on the performance by our VIEs and their respective shareholders of their obligations under the contracts to exercise control over our VIEs. However, the shareholders of our consolidated VIEs may not act in the best interests of our company or may not perform their obligations under these contracts. Such risks exist throughout the period in which we intend to operate certain portions of our business through the contractual arrangements with our VIEs. If any disputes relating to these contracts remain unresolved, we will have to enforce our rights under these contracts through the operations of PRC law and arbitration, litigation and other legal proceedings and therefore will be subject to uncertainties in the PRC legal system. See “— Any failure by our VIEs or their shareholders to perform their obligations under our contractual arrangements with them would have a material and adverse effect on our business.” Therefore, our contractual arrangements with our VIEs may not be as effective in ensuring our control over the relevant portion of our business operations as direct ownership would be.
Any failure by our VIEs or their shareholders to perform their obligations under our contractual arrangements with them would have a material and adverse effect on our business.
We refer to the shareholders of each of our VIEs as its nominee shareholders because although they remain the holders of equity interests on record in each of our VIEs, pursuant to the terms of the relevant power of attorney, each such shareholder has irrevocably authorized our WFOEs to exercise his, her or its rights as a shareholder of the relevant VIE.
If our VIEs or their shareholders fail to perform their respective obligations under the contractual arrangements, we may have to incur additional costs and expend additional resources to enforce such arrangements. We may also have to rely on legal remedies under PRC law, including seeking specific performance or injunctive relief, and claiming damages, which we cannot assure will be effective under PRC law. For example, if the shareholders of our VIEs refuse to transfer their equity interest in our VIEs to us or our designee if we exercise the purchase option pursuant to these contractual arrangements, or if they otherwise act in bad faith toward us, then we may have to take legal actions to compel them to perform their contractual obligations.
All of these contractual arrangements are governed by and interpreted in accordance with PRC law, and disputes arising from these contractual arrangements between us and our variable interest entity will be resolved through arbitration in China. These disputes do not include claims arising under the United States federal securities law and thus the arbitration provisions do not prevent our shareholders from pursuing claims under the United Sates federal securities law. The legal system in the PRC is not as developed as in some other jurisdictions, such as the United States. As a result, uncertainties in the PRC legal system could limit our ability to enforce these contractual arrangements. See “— Risks Related to Doing Business in China — Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of Chinese laws and regulations could limit the legal protections available to us.” Meanwhile, there are very few precedents and little formal guidance as to how contractual arrangements in the context of a VIE should be interpreted or enforced under PRC law. There remain significant uncertainties regarding the ultimate outcome of such arbitration should legal action become necessary. In addition, under PRC law, rulings by arbitrators are final, parties cannot appeal the arbitration results in courts, and if the losing parties fail to carry out the arbitration awards within a prescribed time limit, the prevailing parties may only enforce the arbitration awards in PRC courts through arbitration award recognition proceedings, which would require additional expenses and delay. In the event we are unable to enforce these contractual arrangements, or if we suffer significant delays or other obstacles in the process of enforcing these contractual arrangements, we may not be able to exert effective control over our VIEs, and our ability to conduct our business may be negatively affected.
The shareholders and directors of our VIEs may have potential conflicts of interest with us, which may materially and adversely affect our business and financial condition.
Conflicts of interest may arise out of the dual roles of the individual who is an officer of our company and a shareholder and director of our VIEs, as well as the entity who is both an affiliate of a shareholder of our company and shareholder of our VIEs. These shareholders and directors may breach, or cause our
 
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VIEs to breach, or refuse to renew, the existing contractual arrangements we have with them and our VIEs, which would have a material and adverse effect on our ability to effectively control our VIEs and receive economic benefits from them. For example, the shareholders and directors may be able to cause our agreements with our VIEs to be performed in a manner adverse to us by, among other things, failing to remit payments due under the contractual arrangements to us on a timely basis. We cannot assure you that when conflicts of interest arise any or all of these shareholders and directors will act in the best interests of our company or such conflicts will be resolved in our favor. Currently, we do not have any arrangements to address potential conflicts of interest between these shareholders and directors and our company. If we cannot resolve any conflict of interest or dispute between us and these shareholders and directors, we would have to rely on legal proceedings, which could result in disruption of our business and subject us to substantial uncertainty as to the outcome of any such legal proceedings.
Risks Related to Doing Business in China
Uncertaintieswith respect to the PRC legal system could adversely affect us.
We conduct our business primarily through our subsidiaries and VIEs and their subsidiaries in China. Our operations in China are governed by PRC laws and regulations. Our subsidiaries are generally subject to laws and regulations applicable to foreign investments in China. The PRC legal system is based on written statutes. Prior court decisions may be cited for reference but have limited precedential value.
PRC laws and regulations have significantly enhanced the protections afforded to various forms of foreign investments in China for the past decades. However, China has not developed a fully integrated legal system and recently enacted laws and regulations may not sufficiently cover all aspects of economic activities in China. In particular, because these laws and regulations are relatively new, and because of the limited volume of published decisions and their nonbinding nature, the interpretation and enforcement of these laws and regulations involve uncertainties.
Furthermore, the PRC legal system is based in part on government policies and internal rules, some of which are not published on a timely basis or at all. As a result, we may not be aware of our potential violation of these policies and rules. In addition, any administrative and court proceedings in China may be protracted and result in substantial costs and diversion of resources and management attention.
PRC government has significant oversight over the conduct of our business and it has recently indicated an intent to exert more oversight over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers. Any such action could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless.
Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of Chinese laws and regulations could limit the legal protections available to us.
The PRC legal system is based on written statutes and prior court decisions have limited value as precedents. Since these laws and regulations are relatively new and the PRC legal system continues to rapidly evolve, the interpretations of many laws, regulations and rules are not always consistent and enforcement of these laws, regulations and rules involves uncertainties.
In particular, PRC laws and regulations concerning the used car e-commerce industry are developing and evolving. Although we have taken measures to comply with the laws and regulations that are applicable to our business operations and avoid conducting any activities that may be deemed as illegal under the current applicable laws and regulations, the PRC government authority may promulgate new laws and regulations regulating our industry and amend the existing laws and regulations in the future. See “— Risks Related to Our Business and Industry — Failure to obtain certain filings, approvals, licenses, permits and certificates for our business operations may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations” of our annual report on the 2021 Form 20-F, originally filed with the SEC on July 30, 2021. We cannot assure you that our practices would not be deemed to violate any PRC laws or regulations. Moreover, developments in the used car service industry and online used car transaction industry may lead to changes in PRC laws, regulations and policies or in the interpretation and application of
 
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existing laws, regulations and policies that may limit or restrict online used car dealers like us, which could materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations.
In addition, our PRC subsidiaries are subject to laws and regulations applicable to foreign investment in China. The Foreign Investment Law, which took effect on March 15, 2019, and its current implementation and interpretation rules, which came into effect on January 1, 2020, do not explicitly clarify whether VIEs that are controlled through contractual arrangements would be deemed as foreign-invested enterprises if they are ultimately “controlled” by foreign investors. However, it has a catch-all provision under the definition of “foreign investment” that includes investments made by foreign investors in China through other means as provided by laws, administrative regulations, or the State Council. If our control over its VIEs through contractual arrangements is deemed as a foreign investment in the future, and any business of our VIEs is “restricted” or “prohibited” from foreign investment under the “negative list” effective at the time, we may be deemed to be in violation of the Foreign Investment Law, the contractual arrangements that allow us to have control over our VIEs may be deemed as invalid and illegal.
From time to time, we may have to resort to administrative and court proceedings to enforce our legal rights. However, since PRC administrative and court authorities have significant discretion in interpreting and implementing statutory and contractual terms, it may be more difficult to evaluate the outcome of administrative and court proceedings and the level of legal protection we enjoy than in more developed legal systems. Furthermore, the PRC legal system is based in part on government policies and internal rules (some of which are not published in a timely manner or at all) that may have retroactive effect. As a result, we may not be aware of our violation of these policies and rules until sometime after the violation. Such uncertainties, including uncertainty over the scope and effect of our contractual, property (including intellectual property) and procedural rights, could materially and adversely affect our business and impede our ability to continue our operations. These and other similar legal and regulatory developments could lead to legal and economic uncertainty, affect how we design, market and sell solutions, how we operate our business, how our customers process and share data, how we process and use data, and how we transfer personal data from one jurisdiction to another, which could negatively impact demand for our solutions. We may incur substantial costs to comply with such laws and regulations, to meet the demands of our customers relating to their own compliance with applicable laws and regulations, and to establish and maintain internal compliance policies.
On July 6, 2021, the relevant PRC government authorities made public the Opinions on Strictly Cracking Down Illegal Securities Activities in Accordance with the Law. These opinions emphasized the need to strengthen the administration over illegal securities activities and the supervision on overseas listings by China-based companies and proposed to take effective measures, such as promoting the construction of relevant regulatory systems to deal with the risks and incidents faced by China-based overseas-listed companies. As these opinions were recently issued, official guidance and related implementation rules have not been issued yet and the interpretation of these opinions remains unclear at this stage. As such, we cannot assure you that additional requirements relating to approval from the CSRC or other regulatory authorities or other procedures will not be imposed on us, in connection with this offering or other further offerings of securities. Nor can we assure you that any new rules or regulations promulgated in the future will not impose additional requirements on us. If it is determined in the future that approval from the CSRC or other regulatory authorities or other procedures are required for this offering, it is uncertain whether we can or how long it will take us to obtain such approval or complete such procedures and any such approval or completion could be rescinded. As of the date of this prospectus supplement, we have not received any inquiry, notice, warning, or sanctions regarding offshore offering from the CSRC or any other PRC government authorities. Based on the foregoing and currently effective PRC laws, our PRC counsel are of the view that, as of the date of this prospectus supplement, these opinions do not have a material adverse impact on our business.
The PRC anti-monopoly enforcement agencies have in recent years strengthened enforcement under the PRC Anti-monopoly Law. In March 2018, the State Administration for Market Regulation , or the SAMR, was formed as a new governmental agency to take over, among other things, the anti-monopoly enforcement functions from the relevant departments under the Ministry of Commerce of the PRC, or the MOFCOM, the National Development Reform Committee, or the NDRC, and the State Administration for Industry and Commerce, or the SAIC, respectively. Since its inception, the SAMR has continued to
 
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strengthen anti-monopoly enforcement. In December 2018, the SAMR issued the Notice on Anti-monopoly Enforcement Authorization, which grants authorities to its province-level branches to conduct anti-monopoly enforcement within their respective jurisdictions. In September 2020, the SAMR issued Anti-monopoly Compliance Guideline for Operators, which requires, under the PRC Anti-monopoly Law, operators to establish anti-monopoly compliance management systems to prevent anti-monopoly compliance risks. On February 7, 2021, the Antimonopoly Commission of the State Council officially promulgated the Anti-Monopoly Guidelines for Internet Platforms. Pursuant to an official interpretation from the Anti-monopoly Commission of the State Council, the Anti-Monopoly Guidelines for Internet Platforms mainly covers five aspects, including general provisions, monopoly agreements, abusing market dominance, concentration of undertakings, and abusing of administrative powers eliminating or restricting competition. The Anti-Monopoly Guidelines for Internet Platforms prohibits certain monopolistic acts of internet platforms so as to protect market competition and safeguard interests of users and undertakings participating in internet platform economy, including without limitation, prohibiting companies with dominant position from abusing their market dominance (such as discriminating customers in terms of pricing and other transactional conditions using big data and analytics, coercing counterparties into exclusivity arrangements, using technology means to block competitors’ interface, favorable positioning in search results of goods displays, using bundle services to sell services or products, compulsory collection of unnecessary user data). In addition, the Anti-Monopoly Guidelines for Internet Platforms also reinforces antitrust merger review for internet platform related transactions to safeguard market competition. In practice, the PRC governmental authority also strengthens the supervision of monopoly and other unfair competition acts, and requests to establish a new order of the platform economy. In April 2021, the SAMR, together with certain other PRC government authorities convened an administrative guidance meeting, focusing on unfair competition acts in community group buying, self-inspection and rectification by major internet companies of possible violations of anti-monopoly, anti-unfair competition, tax and other related laws and regulations, and requesting such companies to comply with relevant laws and regulations strictly and be subject to public supervision. In addition, many internet companies, including the over 30 companies which attended such administrative guidance meeting, are required to conduct a comprehensive self-inspection and make necessary rectification accordingly. The SAMR has stated it will organize and conduct inspections on the companies’ rectification results. If the companies are found to conduct illegal activities, more severe penalties are expected to be imposed on them in accordance with the laws. As the Anti-Monopoly Guidelines for Internet Platforms was newly promulgated, we are unable to estimate its specific impact on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. We cannot assure you that our business operations comply with such regulations and authorities’ requirements in all respects. Any failure or perceived failure by us to comply such regulations and authorities’ requirements may result in governmental investigations or enforcement actions, lawsuits or claims against us and could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our ADSs may be delisted or prohibited from being traded over-the-counter under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act if the PCAOB is unable to inspect auditors who are located in China. The delisting or the cessation of trading of our ADSs, or the threat of their being delisted or prohibited from being traded, may materially and adversely affect the value of your investment. Additionally, the inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections deprives our investors with the benefits of such inspections.
The Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, or the HFCA Act, was enacted on December 18, 2020. The HFCA Act states if the SEC determines that we have filed audit reports issued by a registered public accounting firm that has not been subject to inspection by the PCAOB for three consecutive years beginning in 2021, the SEC shall prohibit our shares or ADSs from being traded on a national securities exchange or in the over the counter trading market in the U.S.
Our auditor, the independent registered public accounting firm that issues the audit report included in the 2021 Form 20-F, as an auditor of companies that are traded publicly in the United States and a firm registered with the PCAOB, is subject to laws in the United States pursuant to which the PCAOB conducts regular inspections to assess its compliance with the applicable professional standards. Since our auditor is located in China, a jurisdiction where the PCAOB has been unable to conduct inspections without the approval of the Chinese authorities, our auditor is currently not inspected by the PCAOB.
 
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On March 24, 2021, the SEC adopted interim final rules relating to the implementation of certain disclosure and documentation requirements of the HFCA Act. We will be required to comply with these rules if the SEC identifies us as having a “non-inspection” year under a process to be subsequently established by the SEC. The SEC is assessing how to implement other requirements of the HFCA Act, including the listing and trading prohibition requirements described above. In September 2021, the PCAOB adopted a rule related to the PCAOB’s responsibilities under the HFCA Act, which establishes a framework for the PCAOB to determine, as contemplated under the HFCA Act, whether the PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely registered public accounting firms located in a foreign jurisdiction because of a position taken by one or more authorities in that jurisdiction. The rule was approved by the SEC in November 2021 and has become effective. On December 2, 2021, the SEC issued amendments to finalize the interim final rules. Specifically, the SEC implemented the submission and disclosure requirements under the HFCA Act. Further the SEC established procedures to identify issuers that have filed an annual report with an audit report issued by a registered public accounting firm that is located in a foreign jurisdiction and that the PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate, or Commission-Identified Issuers, and prohibit the trading of the securities of such registrants as required by the HFCA Act. Pursuant to the HFCA Act and the SEC and PCAOB rules, if we have been identified as an Commission-Identified Issuer for three consecutive years, our shares or ADSs will be delisted or prohibited from trading on a national securities exchange or over-the-counter. The earliest time that we could be delisted or prohibited from being traded is 2024 after we file the annual report on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2024.
On June 22, 2021, the U.S. Senate passed a bill which, if passed by the U.S. House of Representatives and signed into law, would reduce the number of consecutive non-inspection years required for triggering the prohibitions under the HFCA Act from three years to two.
The SEC may propose additional rules or guidance that could impact us if our auditor is not subject to PCAOB inspection. For example, on August 6, 2020, the President’s Working Group on Financial Markets, or the PWG, issued the Report on Protecting United States Investors from Significant Risks from Chinese Companies to the then President of the United States. This report recommended the SEC implement five recommendations to address companies from jurisdictions that do not provide the PCAOB with sufficient access to fulfil its statutory mandate. Some of the concepts of these recommendations were implemented with the enactment of the HFCA Act. However, some of the recommendations were more stringent than the HFCA Act. For example, if a company was not subject to PCAOB inspection, the report recommended that the transition period before a company would be delisted would end on January 1, 2022.
The SEC has announced that the SEC staff is preparing a consolidated proposal for the rules regarding the implementation of the HFCA Act to address the recommendations in the PWG report. It is unclear when the SEC will complete its rulemaking and when such rules will become effective and what, if any, of the PWG recommendations will be adopted. The implications of this possible regulation in addition to the requirements of the HFCA Act are uncertain. Such uncertainty could cause the market price of our ADSs to be materially and adversely affected, and our securities could be delisted or prohibited from being traded “over-the-counter” earlier than would be required by the HFCA Act. If our securities are unable to be listed on another securities exchange by then, such a delisting would substantially impair your ability to sell or purchase our ADSs when you wish to do so, and the risk and uncertainty associated with a potential delisting would have a negative impact on the price of our ADSs.
The PCAOB’s inability to conduct inspections in China prevents it from fully evaluating the audits and quality control procedures of our independent registered public accounting firm. As a result, we and investors in our ordinary shares are deprived of the benefits of such PCAOB inspections. The inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections of auditors in China makes it more difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of our independent registered public accounting firm’s audit procedures or quality control procedures as compared to auditors outside of China that are subject to the PCAOB inspections, which could cause investors and potential investors in our stock to lose confidence in the audit procedures and reported financial information and the quality of our financial statements.
In May 2013, the PCAOB announced that it had entered into a Memorandum of Understanding on Enforcement Cooperation with the CSRC, and the PRC Ministry of Finance, which establishes a cooperative framework between the parties for the production and exchange of audit documents relevant to investigations undertaken by the PCAOB in the PRC or by the CSRC or the PRC Ministry of Finance in
 
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the United States. The PCAOB continues to be in discussions with the CSRC and the PRC Ministry of Finance to permit joint inspections in the PRC of audit firms that are registered with the PCAOB and audit Chinese companies that trade on U.S. exchanges.
Risks Related to Our Class A Ordinary Shares and ADSs
If we fail to develop and maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting, we may be unable to accurately report our financial results or prevent fraud.
Prior to our initial public offering in June 2018, we were a private company with limited accounting personnel and other resources with which to address our internal control over financial reporting. In connection with the audits of our consolidated financial statements as of and for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, we and our independent registered public accounting firm identified two material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. As defined in the standards established by the U.S. Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, a “material weakness” is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.
The material weaknesses identified related to (i) our lack of adequate number of accounting staff and management resources with appropriate knowledge of U.S. GAAP and SEC reporting and compliance requirements and (ii) insufficient documented financial closing policies and procedures, specifically those related to period end expenses cut-off and accruals. We are in the process of implementing a number of measures to remedy these control deficiencies. See “Item 15. Controls and Procedures — Internal Control Over Financial Reporting” in our 2021 Form 20-F, which is incorporated by reference in this prospectus supplement. However, the implementation of these measures may not fully address these deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting, and we cannot conclude that they have been fully remedied. Our failure to correct these control deficiencies or our failure to discover and address any other control deficiencies could result in inaccuracies in our financial statements and impair our ability to comply with applicable financial reporting requirements and related regulatory filings on a timely basis. Moreover, ineffective internal control over financial reporting could significantly hinder our ability to prevent fraud.
We are a public company in the United States subject to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or Section 404, requires that we include a report of management on our internal control over financial reporting in our annual report on Form 20-F. In addition, we have ceased to be an “emerging growth company” as such term is defined in the JOBS Act, our independent registered public accounting firm must attest to and report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting beginning with our annual report for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2022. Our management has concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was not effective for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021. Moreover, even if our management concludes that our internal control over financial reporting is effective in the future, our independent registered public accounting firm, after conducting its own independent testing, may issue a report that is qualified if it is not satisfied with our internal controls or the level at which our controls are documented, designed, operated or reviewed, or if it interprets the relevant requirements differently from us. In addition, as we are a public company, our reporting obligations may place a significant strain on our management, operational and financial resources and systems for the foreseeable future. We may be unable to timely complete our evaluation testing and any required remediation.
During the course of documenting and testing our internal control procedures, in order to satisfy the requirements of Section 404, we may identify other weaknesses and deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting. In addition, if we fail to maintain the adequacy of our internal control over financial reporting, as these standards are modified, supplemented or amended from time to time, we may not be able to conclude on an ongoing basis that we have effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404. If we fail to achieve and maintain an effective internal control environment, we could suffer material misstatements in our financial statements and fail to meet our reporting obligations, which would likely cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information. This could in turn limit our access to capital markets, harm our results of operations, and lead to a decline in the trading price of the ADSs. Additionally, ineffective internal control over financial reporting could expose us to increased risk
 
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of fraud or misuse of corporate assets and subject us to potential delisting from the stock exchange on which we list, regulatory investigations and civil or criminal sanctions. We may also be required to restate our financial statements for prior periods.
We have ceased to be an emerging growth company within the meaning of the Securities Act and could no longer take advantage of certain reduced reporting requirements and may incur increased costs as a result.
An emerging growth company as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, or the JOBS Act, may take advantage of specified reduced reporting and other requirements that are otherwise applicable generally to public companies. These provisions include exemption from the auditor attestation requirement under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, in the assessment of the emerging growth company’s internal control over financial reporting. In addition, the JOBS Act provides that an emerging growth company does not need to comply with any new or revised financial accounting standards until such date that a private company is otherwise required to comply with such new and revised accounting standards. As we are no longer an “emerging growth company,” our independent registered public accounting firm must attest to and report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting beginning with our annual report for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2022. We expect to incur significant expenses and devote substantial management effort toward ensuring compliance with the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and the other rules and regulations of the SEC.
 
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USE OF PROCEEDS
We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of securities by the selling shareholders.
 
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CAPITALIZATION
The following table sets forth our capitalization as of June 30, 2021 on an actual basis.
This table should be read in conjunction with, and is qualified in its entirety by reference to, our audited consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto in our annual report on our 2021 Form 20-F, and Form 6-K containing our unaudited financial results for the three months ended June 30, 2021 filed with the SEC on September 24, 2021, which are incorporated by reference into this prospectus.
As of June 30, 2021,
RMB
US$
(in thousands, except for share data)
Indebtedness:
Short-term borrowings and current portion of long-term borrowings
68,684 10,638
Long-term borrowings
233,000 36,087
Shareholders’ Deficit:
Ordinary shares (US$0.0001 par value, 10,000,000,000 shares authorized;
1,077,215,243 Class A ordinary shares and 40,809,861 Class B ordinary
shares issued and outstanding)(1)
737 114
Additional paid-in capital
13,714,761 2,124,146
Accumulated other comprehensive income
242,617 37,577
Accumulated deficit
(15,979,241) (2,474,869)
Total Shareholders’ deficit
(2,021,289) (313,057)
(1)
Does not include 58,258,083 senior convertible preferred shares held by Astral Success Limited, the certificate of designation of which was dated on July 12, 2021. Joy Capital made prepayment of RMB 129.2 million (US$20 million) for the subscription of the 58,258,083 senior convertible preferred shares on June 25, 2021.
 
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OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE
The selling shareholders identified in this prospectus supplement and/or their affiliates may sell from time to time up to an aggregate of 1,325,226,124 Class A ordinary shares, in the form of ADS or otherwise.
 
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SELLING SHAREHOLDERS
This prospectus supplement relates to the proposed sale from time to time by the selling shareholders identified in the table herein and/or their affiliates of up to an aggregate of 1,325,226,124 Class A ordinary shares, in the form of ADS or otherwise, held by the selling shareholders pursuant to this prospectus supplement.
We have no assurance that the selling shareholders will sell any of the securities registered for sale hereunder. The selling shareholders may sell such securities to or through underwriters, dealers or agents or directly to purchasers or otherwise. See “Plan of Distribution.” The selling shareholders may also sell, transfer or otherwise dispose of some or all such securities in transactions exempt from the registration requirements of the Securities Act. Accordingly, we cannot estimate the number of Class A ordinary shares, in the form of ADS or otherwise, that the selling shareholders will sell under this prospectus supplement.
The table below provides information about the ownership of the selling shareholders of our shares and the maximum number of Class A ordinary shares that may be offered from time to time by the selling shareholders hereunder. The selling shareholders may sell less than all of the shares listed in the table below.
The information in the following table and the related notes is based on information filed with the SEC or supplied to us by the selling shareholders. We have not sought to verify such information. Information about the selling shareholders may change over time. Any changed or new information given to us by the selling shareholders will be set forth in supplements to this prospectus supplement, the accompanying prospectus or amendments to the registration statement, if and when necessary.
Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules and regulations of the SEC. In computing the number of shares beneficially owned by a person and the percentage ownership and voting power percentage of that person, we have included shares and associated votes that the person has the right to acquire within 60 days, including through the exercise of any option, warrant or other right or the conversion of any other security. The calculations are based on 1,557,643,691 shares outstanding as of the date of this prospectus supplement, comprising of (i) 1,145438,549 Class A ordinary shares, excluding the 5,895,072 Class A ordinary shares issued to our depositary bank for bulk issuance of ADSs reserved for future issuances upon the exercise or vesting of awards granted under our Amended and Restated Plan, (ii) 40,809,861 Class B ordinary shares and (iii) 371,395,281 senior convertible preferred shares, which can be converted into 371,395,281 Class A ordinary shares on a one-for-one basis at the current applicable conversion price.
 
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Selling
Shareholders:
Class A
Ordinary
Shares
Class B
Ordinary
Shares
Senior
Convertible
Preferred
Shares
Total
Shares
%
% of
Aggregate
Voting Power††
Shares
Registered
Pursuant
to this
Registration
Statement
(Maximum
number
of Shares
that may
be sold)
Nio entities(1)
458,782,405 458,782,405 25.3 21.0 458,782,405
Astral Success Limited(2)
458,782,405 458,782,405 24.8 20.7 458,782,405
GIC Private Limited(3)
207,340,825 207,340,824 13.3 10.8 50,813,008
Redrock Holding Investments Limited(4)
123,847,794 123,847,794 8.0 6.4 123,847,794
Baidu (Hong Kong) Limited(5)
79,832,280 79,832,280 5.1 4.1 79,832,280
TPG Growth III SF Pte. Ltd.(6)
37,608,578 37,608,578 2.4 2.0 37,608,578
58.com Holdings Inc.(7)
29,126,214 29,126,214 1.9 1.5 29,126,214
LC Parallel Fund V, L.P (8)
2,156,615 2,156,615 0.1 0.1 2,156,615
LC Fund V, L.P.(9)
29,395,583 29,395,583 1.9 1.5 29,395,583
JENCAP UX II PLUS LLC(10)
16,872,900 16,872,900 1.1 0.9 16,872,900
JenCap UX(11)
27,572,210 27,572,210 1.8 1.4 27,572,210
Haixia Uxin International Limited Partnership(12)
4,610,889 4,610,889 0.3 0.2 4,610,889
ClearVue UXin Holdings,
Ltd.(13)
5,825,243 5,825,243 0.4 0.3 5,825,243

For each person and group included in this column, percentage ownership is calculated by dividing the number of ordinary shares beneficially owned by such person or group by the sum of the total number of ordinary shares outstanding.
††
For each person and group included in this column, percentage of voting power is calculated by dividing the voting power beneficially owned by such person or group by the voting power of all of our Class A, Class B ordinary shares and senior convertible preferred shares, which are convertible into Class A ordinary shares on a one-for-one basis, as a single class. Each holder of Class A ordinary shares is entitled to one vote per share and each holder of our Class B ordinary shares is entitled to ten votes per share on all matters submitted to them for a vote. Our Class A ordinary shares, Class B ordinary shares and senior convertible preferred shares, which are convertible into Class A ordinary shares on a one-for-one basis, vote together as a single class on all matters submitted to a vote of our shareholders, except as may otherwise be required by law. Our Class B ordinary shares are convertible at any time by the holder thereof into Class A ordinary shares on a one-for-one basis.
(1)
Represents 458,782,405 senior convertible preferred shares, comprising of (i) 174,774,250 senior convertible preferred shares held by Abundant Grace Investment Limited, (ii) 14,564,520 senior convertible preferred shares that Abundant Grace Investment Limited has a right to purchase at the second closing pursuant to the share subscription agreement on June 14, 2021 among us, Abundant Grace Investment Limited and Astral Success Limited, (iii) up to 208,272,647 senior convertible preferred shares that may be acquired upon exercise of the warrant by Abundant Grace Investment Limited pursuant to the warrant agreement entered into with us on November 15, 2021 which replaces the July 12, 2021 warrant agreement, (iv) 29,129,042 senior convertible preferred shares held by Abundant Glory Investment L.P., and (v) up to 32,041,946 senior convertible preferred shares that may be acquired upon exercise of the warrant by Abundant Glory Investment L.P. pursuant to the warrant assignment form entered into with Abundant Grace Investment Limited on November 15, 2021 and the warrant agreement entered with us on the same day. The initial conversion ratio of one senior convertible preferred share and one Class A ordinary share is 1:1, subject to certain adjustments. Each warrant to purchase senior convertible preferred share entitles the warrant holder to purchase one senior
 
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convertible preferred share at an exercise price of US$0.3433, subject to certain adjustments. Such warrants are exercisable, at the option of the holder, at any time and from time to time on or prior to 5 p.m. (New York City time) of January 12, 2023. NBNW Investment Limited and Eve One Fund II L.P. comprise the owners of the majority of the voting interest of Abundant Grace Investment Limited. NBNW Investment Limited is a holding company indirectly and wholly owned by a family trust set up by Mr. Bin Li. Nio Capital II LLC is the general partner of Eve One Fund II L.P. and Abundant Glory Investment L.P., and Mr. Bin Li is one of the managers of Nio Capital II LLC. The registered office of Abundant Grace Investment Limited is at Craigmuir Chambers, Road Town, Tortola, VG 1110, British Virgin Islands. The registered office of Abundant Glory Investment L.P. is Craigmuir Chambers, Road Town, Tortola, VG 1110, British Virgin Islands. The business address of NBNW Investment Limited is P.O. Box 957, Offshore Incorporations Centre Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands. The address of Eve One Fund II L.P. is c/o Harneys Fiduciary (Cayman) Limited, 4th Floor, Harbour Place, 103 South Church Street, Grand Cayman KY1-1002, Cayman Islands. The address of Nio Capital II LLC is Sertus Chambers, Governors Square, Suite #5-204, 23 Lime Tree Bay Avenue, P.O. Box 2547, Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, Cayman Islands. The above is based on the Schedule 13D filed by Eve One Fund II L.P. and Abundant Grace Investment Limited, among others, on July 22, 2021, as amended on November 16, 2021.
(2)
Represents 458,782,405 senior convertible preferred shares, comprising of (i) 167,491,989 senior convertible preferred shares held by Astral Success Limited, (ii) 50,975,823 senior convertible preferred shares that Astral Success Limited has a right to purchase at the second closing pursuant to the share subscription agreement on June 14, 2021 among us, Abundant Grace Investment Limited and Astral Success Limited, and (iii) up to 240,314,593 senior convertible preferred shares that may be acquired upon exercise of the warrant by Astral Success Limited pursuant to the warrant agreement entered into with us on July 12, 2021. Each senior convertible preferred share has a par value of $0.0001 per share and a stated value equal to US$0.3433. The initial conversion ratio of one senior convertible preferred share and one Class A ordinary share is 1:1, subject to certain adjustments. Each warrant to purchase senior convertible preferred share entitles the warrant holder to purchase one senior convertible preferred share at an exercise price of US$0.3433, subject to certain adjustments. Such warrants are exercisable, at the option of the holder, at any time and from time to time on or prior to 5 p.m. (New York City time) of January 12, 2023 Joy Capital Opportunity, L.P., Joy Capital II, L.P. and Joy Capital III, L.P. comprise the owners of the majority of the voting interest of Astral Success Limited. Joy Capital Opportunity GP, L.P., Joy Capital II GP, L.P. and Joy Capital III GP, L.P. are the respective general partners of Joy Capital Opportunity, L.P., Joy Capital II, L.P. and Joy Capital III, L.P. Joy Capital GP, Ltd. is the general partner of Joy Capital Opportunity GP, L.P., Joy Capital II GP, L.P. and Joy Capital III GP, L.P. Each of these entities is ultimately controlled by Mr. Erhai Liu. Mr. Erhai Liu disclaims beneficial ownership of the securities in us held by each of the above entities, except to the extent of Mr. Erhai Liu’s pecuniary interest therein, if any. The registered office of Astral Success Limited is at Craigmuir Chambers, Road Town, Tortola, VG 1110, British Virgin Islands. The address of each of Joy Capital Opportunity, L.P., Joy Capital Opportunity GP, L.P., Joy Capital II, L.P., Joy Capital II GP, L.P., Joy Capital III, L.P., Joy Capital III GP, L.P. and Joy Capital GP, Ltd. is c/o Harneys Services (Cayman) Limited, 4th Floor, Harbour Place, 103 South Church Street, P.O. Box 10240, Grand Cayman KY1-1002, Cayman Islands. The above is based on the Schedule 13D filed by Joy Capital Opportunity, L.P. and Astral Success Limited, among others, on July 22, 2021, as amended on November 16, 2021.
(3)
Represents 207,340,825 Class A ordinary shares beneficially owned by GIC Private Limited. GIC Private Limited is wholly owned by the Government of Singapore and was established with the sole purpose of managing Singapore’s foreign reserves. The Government of Singapore disclaims beneficial ownership of these shares. The business address of GIC Private Limited is 168 Robinson Road, #37-01 Capital Tower, Singapore 068912.
(4)
Represents 112,197,309 Class A ordinary shares directly held by Redrock Holding Investments Limited in the form of 37,399,103 ADSs and 11,650,485 Class A ordinary shares by way of conversion from the convertible notes held by Redrock Holding Investments Limited in principal amount of US$12 million at a conversion price of $1.03 per Class A ordinary share on July 12, 2021, as reported on the Schedule 13D/A filed by Redrock Holding Investments Limited, among others, on July 13, 2021. Redrock Holdings Investments Limited is incorporated in British Virgin Islands and is owned by
 
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Warburg Pincus Private Equity XI, L.P., a Delaware limited partnership, Warburg Pincus Private Equity XI-B, L.P., a Delaware limited partnership, Warburg Pincus Private Equity XI-C, L.P., a Cayman Islands exempted limited partnership, Warburg Pincus XI (Asia), L.P., a Cayman Islands exempted limited partnership, Warburg Pincus XI Partners, L.P., a Delaware limited partnership, and WP XI Partners, L.P., a Delaware limited partnership. Warburg Pincus LLC, a New York limited liability company, is the manager of Warburg Pincus Private Equity XI, L.P., Warburg Pincus Private Equity XI-B, L.P., Warburg Pincus Private Equity XI-C, L.P., Warburg Pincus XI (Asia), L.P., Warburg Pincus XI Partners, L.P., and WP XI Partners, L.P. The general partner of Warburg Pincus Private Equity XI (Asia), L.P., Warburg Pincus Private Equity XI-B, L.P., Warburg Pincus XI Partners and WP XI Partners is Warburg Pincus XI, L.P., a direct subsidiary of Warburg Pincus & CO, a New York general partnership and the general partner of Warburg Pincus XI, L.P. Charles R. Kaye and Joseph P. Landy are the managing general partners of Warburg Pincus & Co., and the ultimate general partners of Warburg Pincus Private Equity XI-C, L.P. and Warburg Pincus XI (Asia), L.P. Charles R. Kaye and Joseph P. Landy disclaim beneficial ownership of all shares held by Warburg Pincus entities mentioned herein. Investment and voting decisions with respect to the shares are made by a committee comprised of three or more individuals and all members of such committee disclaim beneficial ownership of the shares held by Warburg Pincus entities mentioned herein. The registered office of Redrock Holding Investments Limited is P.O. Box 3340, Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands. The above is based on the Schedule 13D/A filed by Redrock Holding Investments Limited, among others, on July 13, 2021.
(5)
Represents 79,832,280 Class A ordinary shares directly held by Baidu (Hong Kong) Limited, as reported on the Schedule 13G filed by Baidu (Hong Kong) Limited, among others, on February 1, 2019. Baidu (Hong Kong) Limited is incorporated in Hong Kong and wholly owned by Baidu, Inc., a public company listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market. The registered office of Baidu (Hong Kong) Limited is Rooms 2201-03, 22/F, World-Wide House, 19 Des Voeux Road Central, Hong Kong. The above is based on the Schedule 13G filed by Baidu (Hong Kong) Limited, among others, on February 1, 2019.
(6)
Represents 37,608,578 Class A ordinary shares directly held by TPG Growth III SF Pte. Ltd. TPG Growth III SF Pte. Ltd. is a company formed under the laws of Singapore whose sole ordinary shareholder is TPG Growth III SF Finance, Limited Partnership, a Prince Edward Island limited partnership. TPG Growth III SF AIV GenPar, L.P., a Cayman Islands limited partnership, is the general partner of TPG Growth III SF Finance, Limited Partnership, and TPG Growth III SF AIV GenPar Advisors, Inc., a Cayman Islands exempted company, is the general partner of TPG Growth III SF AIV GenPar, L.P. The sole ordinary shareholder of TPG Growth III SF AIV GenPar Advisors, Inc. is TPG Holdings III, L.P., a Delaware limited partnership. TPG Holdings III-A, L.P., a Cayman Islands limited partnership, is the general partner of TPG Holdings III, L.P. TPG Holdings III-A, Inc., a Cayman Islands corporation, is the general partner of TPG Holdings III-A, L.P. TPG Group Holdings (SBS), L.P., a Delaware limited partnership, is the sole ordinary shareholder of TPG Holdings III-A, Inc. TPG Group Holdings (SBS) Advisors, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company is the general partner of TPG Group Holdings (SBS), L.P. TPG Group Holdings (SBS) Advisors, Inc., a Delaware corporation, is the sole member of TPG Group Holdings (SBS) Advisors, LLC. The address for all of the entities set forth in this footnote is c/o TPG Global, LLC, 301 Commerce Street, Suite 3300, Fort Worth, Texas 76102.
(7)
Represents 29,126,214 Class A ordinary shares directly held by 58.com Holdings Inc. The registered office of 58.com Holdings Inc. is Commerce House, Wickhams Cay 1, P.O. Box 3140, Road Town, Tortola, VG1110, British Virgin Islands. 58.com Holdings Inc. is wholly owned by Quantum Bloom Group Ltd, a limited liability company incorporated in the Cayman Islands, which is controlled by Jinbo Yao. Mr. Yao holds his interests in Quantum Bloom through Nihao Haven, which is controlled by Mr. Yao through a trust, and Internet Opportunity Haven Company, which he controls as the general partner.
(8)
Represents 2,156,615 Class A ordinary shares directly held by LC Parallel Fund V, L.P., a limited partnership under Cayman Islands law. The general partner of LC Parallel Fund V, L.P. is LC Fund V GP Limited, an entity incorporated in Cayman Islands. 20% of the shares of LC Fund V GP Limited are held by Right Lane Limited, a limited liability company incorporated in Hong Kong. Right Lane Limited is directly controlled by Legend Holdings Corporation, a public company listed on Hong Kong Stock Exchange and incorporated in the People’s Republic of China. Linan Zhu directly held 10% of
 
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the shares of LC Fund V GP Limited and 4.42% of the shares of Legend Holdings Corporation. 11.5% of the shares of LC Fund V GP Limited are held by Nengguang Wang. The rest of the shares of LC Fund V GP Limited are held by shareholders that each held less than 10% of the equity interest of LC Fund V GP Limited. The registered office of LC Parallel Fund V, L.P. Limited is PO Box 309, Ugland House, Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, Cayman Islands.
(9)
Represents 29,395,583 Class A ordinary shares directly held by LC Fund V, L.P. The general partner of LC Fund V, L.P. is LC Fund V GP Limited, an entity incorporated in Cayman Islands. 20% of the shares of LC Fund V GP Limited are held by Right Lane Limited, a limited liability company incorporated in Hong Kong. Right Lane Limited is directly controlled by Legend Holdings Corporation, a public company listed on Hong Kong Stock Exchange and incorporated in the People’s Republic of China. Linan Zhu directly held 10% of the shares of LC Fund V GP Limited and 4.42% of the shares of Legend Holdings Corporation. 11.5% of the shares of LC Fund V GP Limited are held by Nengguang Wang. The rest of the shares of LC Fund V GP Limited are held by shareholders that each has less than 10% of the equity interest of LC Fund V GP Limited. The registered office of LC Parallel Fund V, L.P. Limited is PO Box 309, Ugland House, Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, Cayman Islands.
(10)
Represents 16,872,900 Class A ordinary shares directly held by JENCAP UX II PLUS LLC. , a limited liability company formed in the State of Delaware, United States. JENCAP UX II Plus LLC is wholly owned by JENCAP UX II, of which the management shareholder that controls the voting thereof is Jeneration Capital Management, an exempted company incorporated in Cayman Islands, which is ultimately controlled by Jimmy Ching-Hsin Chang. The registered office of JENCAP UX II PLUS LLC is 2711 Centerville Road, Suite 400, Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A., 19808.
(11)
Represents 27,572,210 Class A ordinary shares directly held by JenCap UX , a company incorporated in Cayman Islands. JenCap UX is wholly owned by Jeneration Capital Partners L.P., of which Jeneration Capital GP is the general partner. Jeneration Capital GP is ultimately controlled by Jimmy Ching-Hsin Chang. The registered office of JenCap UX is PO Box 309, Ugland House, Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, Cayman Islands.
(12)
Represents 4,610,889 Class A ordinary shares directly held by Haixia Uxin International Limited Partnership. Haixia Capital Management Ltd is the general partner of Haixia Uxin International Limited Partnership. Haixia Capital Management Ltd is controlled by Junjie Sun. The registered office of Haixia Uxin International Limited Partnership is Sertus Chambers, P.O. Box 2547, Cassia Court, Camana Bay, Grand Cayman, . Cayman Islands. The address of Junjie Sun and Haixia Capital Management Ltd is Room 2209, Block A, Wanda Plaza, 93 Jianguo Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China.
(13)
Represents 5,825,243 Class A ordinary shares directly held by ClearVue UXin Holdings, Ltd. ClearVue Uxin Holdings, Ltd. is wholly owned by ClearVue Partners II, L.P. ClearVue Partners II GP, L.P. is the general partner of ClearVue Partners II, L.P. The registered office of ClearVue UXin Holdings, Ltd. is PO Box 309, Ugland House, Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, Cayman lslands. The registered office of ClearVue Partners II, L.P. and ClearVue Partners II GP, L.P. is PO Box 309, Ugland House, Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, Cayman Islands.
 
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DIVIDEND POLICY
Our board of directors has discretion on whether to distribute dividends, subject to certain requirements of Cayman Islands law. In addition, our shareholders may by ordinary resolution declare a dividend, but no dividend may exceed the amount recommended by our board of directors. In either case, all dividends are subject to certain restrictions under Cayman Islands law, namely that our company may only pay dividends out of profits or share premium, and provided always that in no circumstances may a dividend be paid if this would result in our company being unable to pay its debts as they fall due in the ordinary course of business. Even if we decide to pay dividends, the form, frequency and amount will depend upon our future operations and earnings, capital requirements and surplus, general financial condition, contractual restrictions and other factors that the board of directors may deem relevant.
We have not declared or paid any dividends on our shares, nor do we have any present plan to pay any cash dividends on our shares in the foreseeable future. We currently intend to retain most, if not all, of our available funds and any future earnings to operate and expand our business.
We are a holding company incorporated in the Cayman Islands. We may rely on dividends from our subsidiaries in China for our cash requirements, including any payment of dividends to our shareholders. PRC regulations may restrict the ability of our PRC subsidiaries to pay dividends to us.
If we pay any dividends on our shares, we will pay those dividends which are payable in respect of the ordinary shares underlying our ADSs to the depositary, as the registered holder of such ordinary shares, and the depositary then will pay such amounts to the ADS holders in proportion to ordinary shares underlying the ADSs held by such ADS holders, subject to the terms of the deposit agreement, including the fees and expenses payable thereunder.
 
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PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION
We are registering the sale of Class A ordinary shares, in the form of ADS or otherwise, that are currently held or may be acquired by the selling shareholders identified in this prospectus supplement from time to time after the date hereof.
The aggregate proceeds to the selling shareholders from the sale of the securities offered by them will be the purchase price of the securities less discounts or commissions, if any. The selling shareholders reserve the right to accept and, together with their agents from time to time, to reject, in whole or in part, any proposed purchase of securities to be made directly or through agents. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of securities by the selling shareholders.
The selling shareholders may sell Class A ordinary shares, in the form of ADS or otherwise, offered by this prospectus supplement, from time to time, in one or more offerings, through agents, to or through dealers or underwriters, directly to purchasers, in “at-the-market offerings”, within the meaning of Rule 415(a)(4) of the Securities Act, to or through a market maker or into an existing trading market, on an exchange or otherwise, or through a combination of any of these methods of sale.
The selling shareholders may sell all or a portion of the Class A ordinary shares, in the form of ADS or otherwise, offered hereby from time to time directly to one or more purchasers through a specific bidding auction process, negotiated sale or otherwise, or through one or more underwriters, broker-dealers or agents. If the securities are sold through underwriters, broker-dealers or agents, the selling shareholders will pay for underwriting discounts or commissions or agent’s commissions. The securities may be sold on any national securities exchange or quotation service on which the securities may be listed or quoted at the time of sale, in the over-the-counter market or in transactions other than on these exchanges or systems or in the over-the-counter market or through the writing of options, whether such options are listed on an options exchange or otherwise, and in one or more transactions at fixed prices which may be changed, at prevailing market prices at the time of the sale, at varying prices determined at the time of sale, or at negotiated prices. These sales may be effected in transactions, which may involve crosses or block transactions. The selling shareholders may use any one or more of the following methods when selling securities:

ordinary brokerage transactions and transactions in which the broker-dealer solicits purchasers;

block trades in which the broker-dealer will attempt to sell the securities as agent but may position and resell a portion of the block as principal to facilitate the transaction;

purchases by a broker-dealer as principal and resale by the broker-dealer for its account;

an exchange distribution in accordance with the rules of the applicable exchange;

privately negotiated transactions;

settlement of short sales entered into after the effective date of the registration statement of which this prospectus supplement is a part;

broker-dealers may agree with the selling shareholders to sell a specified number of such securities at a stipulated price per share;

through the writing or settlement of options or other hedging transactions, whether such options are listed on an options exchange or otherwise;

a combination of any such methods of sale; and

any other method permitted pursuant to applicable law.
The selling shareholders may resell all or a portion of the securities in open market transactions in reliance upon Rule 144 under the Securities Act, as permitted by that rule, or Section 4(a)(1) under the Securities Act, if available, rather than under this prospectus supplement, provided that they meet the criteria and conform to the requirements of those provisions. Any shares covered by this prospectus supplement that qualify for sale under Rule 144 of the Securities Act may also be sold under Rule 144 rather than under this prospectus supplement.
 
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The selling shareholders may, from time to time, pledge or grant a security interest in some or all of the securities owned by them and, if they default in the performance of their secured obligations, the pledgees or secured parties may offer and sell the securities, from time to time, under this prospectus supplement, or under an amendment to this prospectus supplement under Rule 424(b) or other applicable provision of the Securities Act amending the list of selling shareholders to include the pledgee, transferee or other successors in interest as the selling shareholders under this prospectus supplement. The selling shareholders also may transfer or donate the securities in other circumstances, in which case the pledgees, transferees, donees, or other successors in interest will be the selling beneficial owners for purposes of this prospectus supplement and the applicable prospectus supplement.
In connection with the sale of our securities or interests therein, the selling shareholders may enter into hedging transactions with broker-dealers or other financial institutions, which may in turn engage in short sales of the securities in the course of hedging the positions they assume. The selling shareholders may also sell our securities short and deliver these securities to close out their short positions, or loan or pledge the securities to broker-dealers that in turn may sell these securities. The selling shareholders may also enter into option or other transactions with broker-dealers or other financial institutions or the creation of one or more derivative securities which require the delivery to such broker-dealer or other financial institution of securities offered by this prospectus supplement, which shares such broker-dealer or other financial institution may resell pursuant to this prospectus supplement (as further supplemented or amended to reflect such transaction).
The selling shareholders and any underwriters, broker-dealers or agents that participate in the sale of the securities or interests therein may be “underwriters” within the meaning of Section 2(a)(11) of the Securities Act. Any discounts, commissions, concessions or profit they earn on any resale of the securities may be underwriting discounts and commissions under the Securities Act. Selling shareholders who are “underwriters” within the meaning of Section 2(a)(11) of the Securities Act will be subject to the prospectus delivery requirements of the Securities Act.
To the extent required, the securities to be sold, the name of the selling shareholders, the respective purchase prices and public offering prices, the names of any agent, dealer or underwriter, any applicable commissions or discounts with respect to a particular offer and other applicable information will be set forth in the applicable prospectus supplement or free writing prospectus relating to such offering.
In order to comply with the securities laws of some states, if applicable, the securities may be sold in these jurisdictions only through registered or licensed brokers or dealers. In addition, in some states the securities may not be sold unless they have been registered or qualified for sale or an exemption from registration or qualification requirements is available and is complied with.
We have advised the selling shareholders that the anti-manipulation rules of Regulation M under the Exchange Act may apply to sales of our securities in the market and to the activities of the selling shareholders and their affiliates. In addition, to the extent applicable, we will make copies of this prospectus supplement (as it may be supplemented or amended from time to time) available to the selling shareholders for the purpose of satisfying the prospectus delivery requirements of the Securities Act. The selling shareholders may indemnify any broker-dealer that participates in transactions involving the sale of the securities against certain liabilities, including liabilities arising under the Securities Act.
 
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TAXATION
The following summary of the material Cayman Islands, PRC and U.S. federal income tax consequences of an investment in the ADSs or ordinary shares is based upon laws and relevant interpretations thereof in effect as of the date of this prospectus supplement, all of which are subject to change. This summary does not deal with all possible tax consequences relating to an investment in the ADSs or ordinary shares, such as the tax consequences under U.S. state and local tax laws or under the tax laws of jurisdictions other than the Cayman Islands, China and the United States.
Cayman Islands Taxation
The Cayman Islands currently levies no taxes on individuals or corporations based upon profits, income, gains or appreciation and there is no taxation in the nature of inheritance tax or estate duty. There are no other taxes likely to be material to us or our shareholders levied by the government of the Cayman Islands except for stamp duties which may be applicable on instruments executed in, or, after execution, brought within the jurisdiction of the Cayman Islands. The Cayman Islands is not party to any double tax treaties that are applicable to any payments made by our company. There are no exchange control regulations or currency restrictions in the Cayman Islands.
Payments of dividends and capital in respect of our ordinary shares and ADSs will not be subject to taxation in the Cayman Islands and no withholding will be required on the payment of a dividend or capital to any holder of our ordinary shares or the ADSs, nor will gains derived from the disposal of our ordinary shares or the ADSs be subject to Cayman Islands income or corporation tax.
PRC Taxation
Under the PRC Enterprise Income Tax Law and its implementation rules, an enterprise established outside of the PRC with a “de facto management body” within the PRC is considered a resident enterprise and will be subject to the enterprise income tax at the rate of 25% on its global income. The implementation rules define the term “de facto management body” as the body that exercises full and substantial control over and overall management of the business, productions, personnel, accounts and properties of an enterprise. In April 2009, the State Administration of Taxation issued a circular, known as Circular 82, which provides certain specific criteria for determining whether the “de facto management body” of a PRC-controlled enterprise that is incorporated offshore is located in China. Although this circular only applies to offshore enterprises controlled by PRC enterprises or PRC enterprise groups, not those controlled by PRC individuals or foreigners, the criteria set forth in the circular may reflect the State Administration of Taxation’s general position on how the “de facto management body” test should be applied in determining the tax resident status of all offshore enterprises. According to Circular 82, an offshore incorporated enterprise controlled by a PRC enterprise or a PRC enterprise group will be regarded as a PRC tax resident by virtue of having its “de facto management body” in China only if all of the following conditions are met: (i) the primary location of the day-to-day operational management is in the PRC; (ii) decisions relating to the enterprise’s financial and human resource matters are made or are subject to approval by organizations or personnel in the PRC; (iii) the enterprise’s primary assets, accounting books and records, company seals, and board and shareholder resolutions, are located or maintained in the PRC; and (iv) at least 50% of voting board members or senior executives habitually reside in the PRC.
We believe that Uxin Limited is not a PRC resident enterprise for PRC tax purposes. Uxin Limited is not controlled by a PRC enterprise or PRC enterprise group and we do not believe that Uxin Limited meets all of the conditions above. Uxin Limited is a company incorporated outside the PRC. As a holding company, its key assets are its ownership interests in its subsidiaries, and its key assets are located, and its records (including the resolutions of its board of directors and the resolutions of its shareholders) are maintained, outside the PRC. For the same reasons, we believe our other entities outside of China are not PRC resident enterprises either. However, the tax resident status of an enterprise is subject to determination by the PRC tax authorities and uncertainties remain with respect to the interpretation of the term “de facto management body.” There can be no assurance that the PRC government will ultimately take a view that is consistent with us.
 
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If the PRC tax authorities determine that Uxin Limited is a PRC resident enterprise for enterprise income tax purposes, we may be required to withhold a 10% tax from dividends we pay to our shareholders that are non-resident enterprises, including the holders of the ADSs. In addition, non-resident enterprise shareholders (including our ADS holders) may be subject to a 10% PRC tax on gains realized on the sale or other disposition of ADSs or ordinary shares, if such income is treated as sourced from within the PRC. It is unclear whether our non-PRC individual shareholders (including our ADS holders) would be subject to any PRC tax on dividends or gains obtained by such non-PRC individual shareholders in the event we are deemed to be a PRC resident enterprise. If any PRC tax were to apply to such dividends or gains, it would generally apply at a rate of 20% which in the case of dividends may be withheld at source. Any PRC tax liability may be reduced by an applicable tax treaty. However, it is also unclear whether non-PRC shareholders of Uxin Limited would be able to claim the benefits of any tax treaties between their country of tax residence and the PRC in the event that Uxin Limited is treated as a PRC resident enterprise.
Provided that our Cayman Islands holding company, Uxin Limited, is not deemed to be a PRC resident enterprise, holders of our ADSs and ordinary shares who are not PRC residents will not be subject to PRC income tax on dividends distributed by us or gains realized from the sale or other disposition of our shares or the ADSs. SAT Public Notice 7 further clarifies that, if a non-resident enterprise derives income by acquiring and selling shares in an offshore listed enterprise in the public market, such income will not be subject to PRC tax. In addition, SAT Public Notice 37 provided certain key changes to the previous withholding regime, such as (i) the withholding obligation for a non-resident enterprise deriving dividend arises on the date on which the payment is actually made rather than on the date of the resolution that declared the dividends, (ii) non-resident enterprises are not obligated to report tax to relevant authorities if their withholding agents fail to perform the withholding obligation is removed. However, there is uncertainty as to the application of SAT Public Notice 37 and SAT Public Notice 7, we and our non-PRC resident investors may be at risk of being required to file a return and being taxed under SAT Public Notice 37 and SAT Public Notice 7 and we may be required to expend valuable resources to comply with SAT Public Notice 37 and SAT Public Notice 7 or to establish that we should not be taxed under SAT Public Notice 37 and SAT Public Notice 7.
United States Federal Income Tax Considerations
The following discussion is a summary of U.S. federal income tax considerations generally applicable to the ownership and disposition of the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares by a U.S. Holder (as defined below) that holds the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares as “capital assets” ​(generally, property held for investment) under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”). This discussion is based upon existing U.S. federal tax law, which is subject to differing interpretations or change, possibly with retroactive effect. This discussion, moreover, does not address the U.S. federal estate, gift, and alternative minimum tax considerations, Medicare tax on certain net investment or any state, local and non-U.S. tax considerations, relating to the ownership or disposition of the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares. The following summary does not address all aspects of U.S. federal income taxation that may be important to particular investors in light of their individual circumstances or to persons in special tax situations such as:

banks and other financial institutions;

insurance companies;

pension plans;

cooperatives;

regulated investment companies;

real estate investment trusts;

broker-dealers;

traders that elect to use a mark-to-market method of accounting;

certain former U.S. citizens or long-term residents;

tax-exempt entities (including private foundations);
 
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holders who acquire their ADSs or Class A ordinary shares pursuant to any employee share option or otherwise as compensation;

investors that will hold their ADSs or Class A ordinary shares as part of a straddle, hedge, conversion, constructive sale or other integrated transaction for U.S. federal income tax purposes;

investors that have a functional currency other than the U.S. dollar;

persons that actually or constructively own 10% or more of the total combined voting power or value of our stock; or

partnerships or other entities taxable as partnerships for U.S. federal income tax purposes, or persons holding ADSs or Class A ordinary shares through such entities, all of whom may be subject to tax rules that differ significantly from those discussed below.
Each U.S. Holder is urged to consult its tax advisor regarding the application of U.S. federal taxation to its particular circumstances, and the state, local, non-U.S. and other tax considerations of the ownership and disposition of the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares.
General
For purposes of this discussion, a “U.S. Holder” is a beneficial owner of our ADSs or Class A ordinary shares that is, for U.S. federal income tax purposes:

an individual who is a citizen or resident of the United States;

a corporation (or other entity subject to tax as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes) created in, or organized under the law of the United States or any state thereof or the District of Columbia;

an estate the income of which is includible in gross income for U.S. federal income tax purposes regardless of its source; or

a trust (A) the administration of which is subject to the primary supervision of a U.S. court and which has one or more U.S. persons who have the authority to control all substantial decisions of the trust or (B) that has otherwise validly elected to be treated as a U.S. person under the Code.
If a partnership (or other entity treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes) is a beneficial owner of the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares, the tax treatment of a partner in the partnership will generally depend upon the status of the partner and the activities of the partnership. Partnerships holding the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares and their partners are urged to consult their tax advisors regarding an investment in the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares.
For U.S. federal income tax purposes, it is generally expected that a U.S. Holder of ADSs will be treated as the beneficial owner of the underlying Class A ordinary shares represented by the ADSs, and therefore deposits or withdrawals of Class A ordinary shares for ADSs will generally not be subject to U.S. federal income tax. The remainder of this discussion assumes that a U.S. Holder of the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares will be treated in this manner.
Passive Foreign Investment Company Considerations
A non-U.S. corporation, such as our company, will be classified as a PFIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes for any taxable year, if either (i) 75% or more of its gross income for such year consists of certain types of “passive” income or (ii) 50% or more of the value of its assets (generally based on an average of the quarterly values of the assets) during such year is attributable to assets that produce or are held for the production of passive income (the “asset test”). A separate determination must be made after the close of each taxable year as to whether a non-United States corporation is a PFIC for that year. Passive income generally includes dividends, interest, royalties, rents, annuities, net gains from the sale or exchange of property producing such income and net foreign currency gains. For this purpose, cash and assets readily convertible into cash are categorized as passive assets and the company’s goodwill and other unbooked intangibles associated with active business activity is taken into account as a non-passive asset.
 
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In addition, a non-U.S. corporation will be treated as owning a proportionate share of the assets and earning a proportionate share of the income of any other corporation in which it owns, directly or indirectly, 25% or more (by value) of the stock. Although the law in this regard is not entirely clear, we treat our VIEs and their subsidiaries as being owned by us for U.S. federal income tax purposes because we control the management decisions and are entitled to substantially all of the economic benefits associated with these entities. As a result, we consolidate their results of operations in our consolidated U.S. GAAP financial statements. If it were determined, however, that we do not own the stock of our VIEs and their subsidiaries for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we may be treated as a PFIC for the current taxable year and any subsequent taxable year.
Assuming that we are the owner of our VIEs and their subsidiaries for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we do not believe that we were a PFIC for our taxable year ended March 31, 2021 and we do not presently expect to be a PFIC for the current taxable year or the foreseeable future. However, no assurance can be given in this regard because the determination of whether we are or will become a PFIC is a fact-intensive inquiry made on an annual basis that depends, in part, upon the composition of our income and assets and the value of our assets. As previously disclosed, we believed that we were a PFIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes for our taxable year ended December 31, 2019. Fluctuations in the market price of our ADSs may cause us to become a PFIC for the current or future taxable years because the value of our assets for the purpose of the asset test, including the value of our goodwill and unbooked intangibles, may be determined by reference to the market price of our ADSs from time to time (which may be volatile). The composition of our income and assets may also be affected by how, and how quickly, we use our liquid assets. If our market capitalization subsequently declines, we may be or become a PFIC for the current taxable year or future taxable years. Under circumstances where our revenue from activities that produce passive income significantly increases relative to our revenue from activities that produce non-passive income, or where we determine not to deploy significant amounts of cash for active purposes, our risk of becoming a PFIC may substantially increase.
If we are a PFIC for any year during which a U.S. Holder holds our ADSs or Class A ordinary shares, we generally would continue to be treated as a PFIC for all succeeding years during which such U.S. Holder holds our ADSs or Class A ordinary shares even if we cease to meet the threshold requirements for PFIC status. However, if we cease to be a PFIC, provided that you have not made a mark-to-market election, as described below, you may avoid some of the adverse effects of the PFIC regime by making a “deemed sale” election with respect to the ADSs or ordinary shares, as applicable. If such election is made, you will be deemed to have sold our ADSs or Class A ordinary shares you hold at their fair market value and any gain from such deemed sale would be subject to the rules described in the following two paragraphs. After the deemed sale election, so long as we do not become a PFIC in a subsequent taxable year, your ADSs or Class A ordinary shares with respect to which such election was made will not be treated as shares in a PFIC and you will not be subject to the rules described below with respect to any “excess distribution” you receive from us or any gain from an actual sale or other disposition of the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares. The rules dealing with deemed sale elections are very complex. Each U.S. Holder should consult its tax advisors regarding the possibility and consequences of making a deemed sale election if we cease to be a PFIC and such election becomes available to you.
The United States federal income tax rules that apply if we are classified as a PFIC for the current taxable year or any subsequent taxable year are generally discussed below under “— Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules.”
Dividends
Subject to the discussion below under “— Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules,” any cash distributions (including the amount of any PRC tax withheld) paid on the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares out of our current or accumulated earnings and profits, as determined under U.S. federal income tax principles, will generally be includible in the gross income of a U.S. Holder as dividend income on the day actually or constructively received by the U.S. Holder, in the case of Class A ordinary shares, or by the depositary, in the case of ADSs. Because we do not intend to determine our earnings and profits on the basis of U.S. federal income tax principles, any distribution we pay will generally be treated as a “dividend” for
 
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U.S. federal income tax purposes. Dividends received on the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares will not be eligible for the dividends received deduction allowed to corporations in respect of dividends received from U.S. corporations.
A non-corporate U.S. Holders will be subject to tax at the lower capital gains tax rate applicable to “qualified dividend income,” provided that certain conditions are satisfied, including that (1) the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares on which the dividends are paid are readily tradable on an established securities market in the United States, or, in the event that we are deemed to be a PRC resident enterprise under the PRC tax law, we are eligible for the benefit of the United States-PRC income tax treaty, (2) we are neither a PFIC nor treated as such with respect to a U.S. Holder (as discussed below) for the taxable year in which the dividend is paid or the preceding taxable year, (3) certain holding period requirements are met, and (4) such non-corporate U.S. Holders are not under an obligation to make related payments with respect to positions in substantially similar or related property. For this purpose, ADSs listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market will generally be considered to be readily tradable on an established securities market in the United States. Although the law in this regard is not entirely clear, since we do not expect our Class A ordinary shares will be listed on any securities market, we do not believe that Class A ordinary shares that are not represented by ADSs will generally be considered to be readily tradable on an established securities market in the United States. There can be no assurance that our ADSs will continue to be considered readily tradable on an established securities market in later years. Furthermore, as previously disclosed, we believed that we were a PFIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes for our taxable year ended December 31, 2019. Each U.S. Holder should consult its tax advisors regarding the availability of the lower rate for dividends paid with respect to the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares.
In the event that we are deemed to be a PRC resident enterprise under the PRC Enterprise Income Tax Law, a U.S. Holder may be subject to PRC withholding taxes on dividends paid on the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares. We may, however, be eligible for the benefits of the United States-PRC income tax treaty. If we are eligible for such benefits, dividends we pay on our Class A ordinary shares, regardless of whether such shares are represented by the ADSs, and regardless of whether our ADSs are readily tradable on an established securities market in the United States, would be eligible for the reduced rates of taxation applicable to qualified dividend income, as described in the preceding paragraph. Dividends received on the ADSs or ordinary shares will not be eligible for the dividends received deduction allowed to corporations.
For U.S. foreign tax credit purposes, dividends paid on the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares generally will be treated as income from foreign sources and generally will constitute passive category income. If PRC withholding taxes apply to dividends paid to you with respect to the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares, you may be able to obtain a reduced rate of PRC withholding taxes under the United States-PRC income tax treaty if certain requirements are met. In addition, subject to certain conditions and limitations, PRC withholding taxes on dividends that are non-refundable under the income tax treaty between the United States and the PRC may be treated as foreign taxes eligible for credit against your U.S. federal income tax liability. If a U.S. Holder does not elect to claim a foreign tax credit, such holder may instead claim a deduction for U.S. federal income tax purposes in respect of such withholding, but only for a year in which such holder elects to do so for all creditable foreign income taxes. Each U.S. Holder should consult its tax advisors regarding the creditability of any PRC tax.
Sale or Other Disposition
Subject to the discussion below under “— Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules,” a U.S. Holder will generally recognize gain or loss upon the sale or other disposition of our ADSs or Class A ordinary shares in an amount equal to the difference between the amount realized upon the disposition and the holder’s adjusted tax basis in such ADSs or Class A ordinary shares. The gain or loss will generally be capital gain or loss. Individuals and other non-corporate U.S. Holders who have held the ADS or Class A ordinary shares for more than one year will generally be eligible for reduced tax rates. The deductibility of a capital loss may be subject to limitations. Any such gain or loss that the U.S. Holder recognizes will generally be treated as U.S. source income or loss for foreign tax credit limitation purposes, which will generally limit the availability of foreign tax credits. However, in the event we are deemed to be a PRC resident enterprise under the PRC Enterprise Income Tax Law, a U.S. Holder may be subject to PRC tax upon the disposition of our ADSs or Class A ordinary shares. In such event, if PRC tax were to be imposed on any gain from such
 
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disposition, a U.S. Holder that is eligible for the benefits of the United States-PRC income tax treaty may elect to treat such gain as PRC source income. Each U.S. Holder should consult its tax advisors regarding the creditability of any PRC tax.
Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules
If we are classified as a PFIC for any taxable year during which a U.S. Holder holds our ADSs or Class A ordinary shares, and unless the U.S. Holder makes a mark-to-market election (as described below), the U.S. Holder will generally be subject to special tax rules that have a penalizing effect regardless of whether we remain a PFIC on (i) any excess distribution that we make to the U.S. Holder (which generally means any distribution paid during a taxable year to a U.S. Holder that is greater than 125 percent of the average annual distributions paid in the three preceding taxable years or, if shorter, the U.S. Holder’s holding period for the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares), and (ii) any gain realized on the sale or other disposition of ADSs or Class A ordinary shares. Under the PFIC rules:

such excess distribution and/or gain will be allocated ratably over the U.S. Holder’s holding period for the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares;

such amount allocated to the current taxable year and any taxable years in the U.S. Holder’s holding period prior to the first taxable year in which we are classified as a PFIC (each, a “pre-PFIC year”), will be taxable as ordinary income;

such amount allocated to each prior taxable year, other than a pre-PFIC year, will be subject to tax at the highest tax rate in effect for individuals or corporations, as appropriate, for that year; and

an interest charge generally applicable to underpayments of tax will be imposed on the tax attributable to each prior taxable year, other than a pre-PFIC year.
If we are a PFIC for any taxable year during which a U.S. Holder holds our ADSs or Class A ordinary shares and any of our subsidiaries, our VIEs or any of the subsidiaries of our VIEs is also a PFIC, such U.S. Holder would be treated as owning a proportionate amount (by value) of the shares of the lower-tier PFIC for purposes of the application of these rules. U.S. Holders are urged to consult their tax advisors regarding the application of the PFIC rules to any of our subsidiaries, our VIEs or any of the subsidiaries of our VIEs.
As an alternative to the foregoing rules, a U.S. Holder of “marketable stock” in a PFIC may make a mark-to-market election with respect to such stock. The mark-to-market election is available only for “marketable stock,” which is stock that is regularly traded on a qualified exchange or other market, as defined in applicable United States Treasury regulations. We expect that our ADSs will continue to be listed on the NASDAQ Global Select Market, which is a qualified exchange for these purposes, and, consequently, assuming that the ADSs are regularly traded, it is expected that the mark-to-market election would be available to a U.S. Holder of our ADSs if were we to become a PFIC, but no assurances are given in this regard. If a U.S. Holder makes this election with respect to the ADSs, the holder will generally (i) include as ordinary income for each taxable year that we are a PFIC the excess, if any, of the fair market value of ADSs held at the end of the taxable year over the adjusted tax basis of such ADSs and (ii) deduct as an ordinary loss in each such taxable year the excess, if any, of the adjusted tax basis of the ADSs over the fair market value of such ADSs held at the end of the taxable year, but such deduction will only be allowed to the extent of the amount previously included in income as a result of the mark-to-market election. The U.S. Holder’s adjusted tax basis in the ADSs would be adjusted to reflect any income or loss resulting from the mark-to-market election. If a U.S. Holder makes a mark-to-market election in respect of the ADSs and we cease to be classified as a PFIC, the holder will not be required to take into account the gain or loss described above during any period that we are not classified as a PFIC. If a U.S. Holder makes a mark-to-market election, any gain such U.S. Holder recognizes upon the sale or other disposition of the ADSs in a year when we are a PFIC will be treated as ordinary income and any loss will be treated as ordinary loss, but such loss will only be treated as ordinary loss to the extent of the net amount previously included in income as a result of the mark-to-market election.
Because a mark-to-market election technically cannot be made for any lower-tier PFICs that we may own, a U.S. Holder may continue to be subject to the PFIC rules with respect to such U.S. Holder’s indirect interest in any investments held by us that are treated as an equity interest in a PFIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes.
 
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We do not intend to provide information necessary for U.S. Holders to make qualified electing fund elections which, if available, would result in tax treatment different from (and generally less adverse than) the general tax treatment for PFICs described above.
If a U.S. Holder owns our ADSs or Class A ordinary shares during any taxable year that we are a PFIC, the holder must generally file an annual report containing such information as the United States Treasury Department may require. Each U.S. Holder should consult its tax advisors regarding the U.S. federal income tax consequences of owning and disposing of the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares if we are or become a PFIC, including the possibility of making a mark-to-market election.
 
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LEGAL MATTERS
We are being represented by Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP with respect to certain legal matters of United States federal securities law and New York State law, by Maples and Calder (Hong Kong) LLP with respect to legal matters of Cayman Islands law, and by Beijing Docvit Law Firm with respect to legal matters of PRC law. The validity of the Class A ordinary shares offered hereby and legal matters as to Cayman Islands law will be passed upon for us by Maples and Calder (Hong Kong) LLP. Certain legal matters as to PRC law will be passed upon for us by Beijing Docvit Law Firm. Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP and Maples and Calder (Hong Kong) LLP may rely upon Beijing Docvit Law Firm with respect to matters governed by PRC law. Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP may rely upon Maples and Calder (Hong Kong) LLP with respect to matters governed by Cayman Islands law.
If legal matters in connection with offerings made pursuant to this prospectus supplement are passed upon by counsel to underwriters, dealers or agents, such counsel will be named in the applicable prospectus supplement or free writing prospectus relating to any such offerings.
 
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EXPERTS
The financial statements incorporated in this prospectus supplement by reference to the Annual Report on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021 have been so incorporated in reliance on the report of PricewaterhouseCoopers Zhong Tian LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, given on the authority of said firm as experts in auditing and accounting.
The offices of PricewaterhouseCoopers Zhong Tian LLP are located at 11/F PricewaterhouseCoopers Center, Link Square 2, 202 Hu Bin Road, Huangpu District, Shanghai, the People’s Republic of China.
 
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EXPENSES
The following table sets forth the aggregate expenses to be paid by us in connection with the offering made hereby. All amounts shown are estimates, except for the SEC registration fee.
SEC registration fee
US$  66,543
Legal fees and expenses
112,000
Miscellaneous
10,000
Total
US$ 188,543
 
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PROSPECTUS
Uxin Limited
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Class A Ordinary Shares
Preferred Shares
Warrants
Subscription Rights
Units
We may from time to time in one or more offerings offer and sell our Class A ordinary shares, par value US$0.0001 per share, including in the form of American depositary shares, or ADSs, preferred shares, warrants to purchase Class A ordinary shares and preferred shares, subscription rights and a combination of such securities, separately or as units, in one or more offerings. We refer to our ADSs, Class A ordinary shares, preferred shares, warrants, subscription rights and units collectively as “securities” in this prospectus. This prospectus provides a general description of offerings of these securities that we may undertake.
In addition, from time to time, selling shareholders (if any) to be named in a prospectus supplement may offer and sell our Class A ordinary shares, including Class A ordinary shares represented by ADSs, held by them. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of our Class A ordinary shares by selling shareholders.
The ADSs are listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market, or Nasdaq, under the ticker symbol “UXIN.”
We will provide specific terms of any offering in one or more supplements to this prospectus. Any prospectus supplement may also add, update, or change information contained in this prospectus. You should carefully read this prospectus and the applicable prospectus supplement as well as the documents incorporated or deemed to be incorporated by reference in this prospectus before you purchase any of the securities offered hereby.
These securities may be offered and sold in the same offering or in separate offerings; to or through underwriters, dealers, and agents; or directly to purchasers. The names of any underwriters, dealers, or agents involved in the sale of our securities, their compensation and any options to purchase additional securities held by them will be described in the applicable prospectus supplement. For a more complete description of the plan of distribution of these securities, see the section entitled “Plan of Distribution” beginning on page 50 of this prospectus.
We are an “emerging growth company” under applicable U.S. federal securities laws and are eligible for reduced public company reporting requirements.
Investing in these securities involves a high degree of risk. Furthermore, investors should be aware that there are various other risks relating to the securities, the issuer and its subsidiaries and VIEs and their subsidiaries, their business and their jurisdictions of operations which investors should familiarize themselves with before making an investment in the securities. Please carefully consider the risks discussed under “Risk Factors” in this prospectus beginning on page 9, in any accompanying prospectus supplement or in our reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission that are incorporated by reference in this prospectus before making a decision to invest in our securities.
Investors in the securities are purchasing securities of Uxin Limited, a Cayman Islands holding company with no equity ownership in its VIEs and their subsidiaries. We conduct our operations in China through (i) our PRC subsidiaries and (ii) our VIEs and their subsidiaries with which we have maintained contractual arrangements. We derived 10.2%, 4.6%, 5.1% and 0.9% of our net revenues from our VIEs and their subsidiaries for the year ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, the three months ended March 31, 2020 and the year ended March 31, 2021, respectively. As used in this prospectus, “we,” “us,” “our company,” or “our,” refers to Uxin Limited, our Cayman Islands holding company, and its subsidiaries, and, in the context of describing our operations and consolidated financial information, our VIEs and their subsidiaries in China.
Our corporate structure is subject to risks associated with our contractual arrangements with our VIEs. If the PRC government deems that our contractual arrangements with our VIEs do not comply with PRC regulatory restrictions on foreign investment in the relevant industries, or if these regulations or the interpretation of existing regulations change or are interpreted differently in the future, we could be subject to severe penalties or be forced to relinquish our interests in those operations. Our holding company, our PRC subsidiaries and VIEs and their subsidiaries, and investors of our company face uncertainty about potential future actions by the PRC government that could affect the enforceability of the contractual arrangements with our VIEs and, consequently, significantly affect the financial performance of our VIEs and their subsidiaries and our company as a whole. Our Class A ordinary shares or our ADSs may decline in value or become worthless, if we are unable to assert our contractual control rights over the assets of our VIEs that conduct some or all of our operations. For a detailed description of the risks associated with our corporate structure, please refer to risks disclosed under “Item 3.D. Key Information — Risk Factors — Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure” in our Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, which is incorporated by reference and “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure” in this prospectus.
We face various risks and uncertainties related to doing business in China. Our business operations are primarily conducted in China, and we are subject to complex and evolving PRC laws and regulations. For example, we face risks associated with regulatory approvals on offshore offerings, anti-monopoly regulatory actions, and oversight on cybersecurity and data privacy, as well as the lack of PCAOB inspection on our auditors. For a detailed description of risks related to doing business in China, “Item 3.D. Key Information — Risk Factors — Risks Related to Doing Business in China” in our Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, which is incorporated by reference in this prospectus, and “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Doing Business in China” in this prospectus.
This prospectus may not be used to offer or sell any securities unless accompanied by a prospectus supplement.
Neither the United States Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
The date of this prospectus is August 31, 2021.

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You should rely only on the information contained or incorporated by reference into this prospectus, in the applicable prospectus supplement or in any free writing prospectus filed by us with the SEC. We have not authorized any other person to provide you with different information. If anyone provides you with different or inconsistent information, you should not rely on it. You should not assume that the information contained or incorporated by reference into this prospectus and any prospectus supplement or in any free writing prospectus is accurate as of any date other than the respective dates thereof. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since those dates.
We are not making an offer to sell the securities or soliciting an offer to buy the securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.
 
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ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS
This prospectus is part of an automatic shelf registration statement that we filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, as a “well-known seasoned issuer” as defined in Rule 405 under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act. By using an automatic shelf registration statement, we or any selling shareholder may, at any time and from time to time, sell the securities described in this prospectus in one or more offerings. This prospectus provides you with a general description of the securities offered. Each time this prospectus is used to offer securities, we will provide one or more prospectus supplements that will contain specific information about the offering and the terms of those securities. We may also add, update or change information contained in this prospectus by means of a prospectus supplement or by incorporating by reference information that we file or furnish to the SEC. If there is any inconsistency between the information in this prospectus and any related prospectus supplement, you should rely on the information in the applicable prospectus supplement. As allowed by the SEC rules, this prospectus and any accompanying prospectus supplement do not contain all of the information included in the registration statement. For further information, we refer you to the registration statement, including its exhibits. Statements contained in this prospectus or any prospectus supplement about the provisions or contents of any agreement or other document are not necessarily complete. If the SEC’s rules and regulations require that an agreement or document be filed as an exhibit to the registration statement, please see that agreement or document for a complete description of these matters.
You should carefully read this document and any applicable prospectus supplement. You should also read the documents we have referred you to under “Where You Can Find More Information” and “Incorporation of Certain Documents by Reference” below for information on our company, the risks we face and our financial statements. The registration statement and exhibits can be read on the SEC’s website as described under “Where You Can Find More Information.”
In this prospectus, unless otherwise indicated or unless the context otherwise requires:

“ADSs” are to the American depositary shares, each of which represents three Class A ordinary shares, par value US$0.0001 each;

“Check Auto” are to our proprietary car inspection system;

“China” or “PRC” are to the People’s Republic of China, excluding, for the purpose of this prospectus only, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau;

“RMB” and “Renminbi” are to the legal currency of China, which is our reporting currency;

“NPS” are to net percentages of promoters for our products and services (those who are willing to keep buying and refer us to others) against detractors (those who are not satisfied with and complain about our offerings)

“shares” or “ordinary shares” are to our Class A and Class B ordinary shares, par value US$0.0001 per share;

“US$,” “U.S. dollars,” “$,” and “dollars” are to the legal currency of the United States;

“Uxin” or “our platform” are to our platform primarily for buying and selling used cars, which primarily consisted of vehicle sales businesses under our new inventory owning model for the fiscal year of 2021;

“Our WFOEs” are to our wholly-owned subsidiaries in China;

“Our VIEs” are to our variable interest entities, which are Youxin Internet (Beijing) Information Technology Co., Ltd., and Youxin Yishouche (Beijing) Information Technology Co., Ltd.; and

“we,” “us,” “our company” and “our” are to Uxin Limited, our Cayman Islands holding company, and its subsidiaries, and its VIEs and their subsidiaries in the PRC.
References in any prospectus supplement to “the accompanying prospectus” are to this prospectus and to “the prospectus” are to this prospectus and the applicable prospectus supplement taken together. Unless otherwise noted, all translations from Renminbi to U.S. dollars and from U.S. dollars to Renminbi in this prospectus are made at a rate of RMB6.5518 to US$1.00, the exchange rate in effect as of March 31, 2021
 
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as set forth in the H.10 statistical release of The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. We make no representation that any Renminbi or U.S. dollar amounts could have been, or could be, converted into U.S. dollars or Renminbi, as the case may be, at any particular rate, or at all.
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This prospectus and the documents incorporated by reference herein contain forward-looking statements that reflect our current expectations and views of future events. These statements are made under the “safe harbor” provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. You can identify these forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “will,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “aim,” “intend, “plan,” “believe,” “estimate,” “is/are likely to,” “future,” “potential,” “continue” or other similar expressions. We have based these forward-looking statements largely on our current expectations and projections about future events and financial trends that we believe may affect our financial condition, results of operations, business strategy and financial needs. These forward-looking statements include statements relating to, among other things:

our goals and strategies;

our ability to provide customers with high-quality used cars and other related products;

our ability to provide quality services and compete effectively;

our ability to effectively manage risks, including credit risks and fraud risks;

our future business development, financial condition and results of operations;

expected changes in our revenues, costs, expenses or expenditures;

the expected growth of, and trends in, the market for our services;

our expectations regarding demand for and market acceptance of our services;

competition in our industry;

relevant government policies and regulations relating to our industry;

public health crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, MERS, SARS, H1N1 flu, H7N9 flu, and avian flu; and

general economic and business conditions in China and globally.
The forward-looking statements included in this prospectus, in the documents incorporated by reference herein and in any prospectus supplement are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions about our company. Our actual results of operations may differ materially from the forward-looking statements as a result of the risk factors disclosed in this prospectus, in the documents incorporated by reference herein or in any applicable prospectus supplement.
We would like to caution you not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, and you should read these statements in conjunction with the risk factors disclosed herein, in the documents incorporated by reference herein or in any applicable prospectus supplement for a more complete discussion of the risks of an investment in our securities. We operate in a rapidly evolving environment. New risks emerge from time to time and it is impossible for our management to predict all risk factors, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ from those contained in any forward-looking statement. We do not undertake any obligation to update or revise the forward-looking statements except as required under applicable law.
 
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OUR COMPANY
We are a leading nationwide online used car dealer in China. As the online destination in China for consumers to buy used cars, we make it possible for consumers to choose from our nationwide selection of used cars and buy the car directly online from our platform. In September 2020, we successfully shifted to an inventory-owning model. The completion of our business model upgrade gave us better control over order flow and supply chain management, and this further strengthens our ability to maximize customer value through our dedicated approach: offering quality value-for-money used cars alongside best-in-class purchasing services.
Our mission is to enable people to buy the car of their choice. Consumers in China have been facing significant challenges when buying used cars via traditional supply chains, such as limited access to a wide selection of used cars, inconvenience in buying used cars from other cities and regions, lack of transparent and reliable information about car condition and complex transaction processes. Operated under the brand Uxin Used Car (优信二手车), our platform addresses these issues by providing consumers with a reliable and one-stop online car buying experience and enabling consumers to select from our nationwide selection of Uxin Certified used cars and access various car-related value-added products and services online throughout China.
We have transformed the used car buying experience in China through our innovative integrated online platform and offline service and fulfilment networks, which takes care of each step of the transaction process and covers the entire value chain. In the second half of 2020, we upgraded our used car transaction value chain and migrated every sales step online. Our online platform ensures that consumers have access not only to an extensive nationwide selection of used cars, but also to a wide range of value-added products and services. In addition, we engage offline third-party service providers to effectively serve consumers and fulfill the transactions made online, such as car delivery, title transfers and other after-sales services. In particular, we provide car inspection services leveraging our inspection capabilities, which allow us to collect proprietary data, images and videos of used cars and generate accurate car condition reports. This allow convenient car comparison and is crucial to consumers’ decision-making process of buying used cars online. With a significant amount of data aggregated on our platform, we are able to continue to innovate and improve our products and services to meet consumers’ varied needs. Together, our products and services provide consumers with the superior experience and peace of mind that our brand embodies. In fact, our name, Uxin (优信), translates to quality and trust in Chinese.
Our comprehensive products and services are supported by a number of critical foundations, including proprietary technology and data analytics capabilities, one-stop online services capabilities and unique online used car transaction fulfillment capabilities.

Technology and Data Analytics Capabilities:   Our patented and industry-leading car inspection system, Check Auto (查客), provides a comprehensive overview of a used car’s condition. Our AI- and big data-driven Manhattan pricing engine provides consumers with pricing insights based on each used car’s condition, as well as serving as an algorithmic foundation for determining the ranking of used cars listed on our platform according to each car’s price and performance data. In addition, based on a wealth of data we have on user behavior and used car inventory, our AI-enabled Lingxi (灵犀) intelligent recommendation system provides personalized car recommendations to consumers by analyzing their preferences, which makes it easier for them to find the car of their choice; and our AI-powered Edison intelligent user profiling system helps our customer service personnel and sales consultants better understand consumer profiles by analyzing their preferences in real time and predicting which used cars they are likely to buy, which enables us to create more effective sales strategies.

One-Stop Online Services and Online Transaction Fulfillment Capabilities:   In 2020, we have upgraded and transformed the entire used car buying process and migrated every step in the sales process online. We offer online sales consulting and assistance services without the need to assign our sales consultant offline to assist in a purchase once the consumer demonstrates intention to purchase on our platform. As a result, we replaced our offline sales team with an online consulting team that delivers timely vehicle consulting services and facilitates a seamless self-service purchasing experience. In addition, we also enhanced the responsiveness and quality of our aftersales services
 
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delivered through online chat and hotlines to ensure high customer satisfaction. Our unique transaction fulfillment capabilities are empowered by our nationwide logistics and delivery network, nationwide title transfer and vehicle registration service and industry-leading warranty programs. Our nationwide logistics and delivery network ensure timely delivery of used cars to consumers. Our title transfer and vehicle registration service efficiently handles a potentially time-consuming and complex process for consumers. Our warranty programs provide consumers with comprehensive post-sale protection.
We also collaborate with various third-party partners to provide a wide range of value-added products and services on our platform, such as auto financing options and insurance products, as well as after-sales services.
In April 2021, we entered into a strategic partnership with JD.com to launch our self-operated online store for used car transactions through JD’s platform. The collaboration will provide consumers with one-stop online used car purchase solutions including used car inspection, purchasing, insurance, and aftersales services, and includes plans for joint development of data management, technology, inspection standards, and integrated supply chains in the used car business. The cooperation with JD.com will offer our customers a higher quality and more reliable used car purchasing experience than exists in the market at present.
Since we launched our online used-car-buying product and service offerings in early 2018, we have evolved from a financing-oriented platform to a transaction-centric online used car dealer who offers quality value-for-money used cars, premium purchasing services and online one-stop convenience. From 2018 when we started to provide 2C online used car transaction services to 2019, we witnessed significant growth in our business. However, as a result of the disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic to our business operations as well as our business transformation, the total number of online used car transactions completed through our 2C platform decreased by 89.9% from 97,100 in 2019 to 9,835 in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021.
To further strengthen our ability to provide used cars of high quality and value-for-money, we are building our own Inspection and Reconditioning Centers (IRCs) where we can refurbish highly selected inventory to a “like new” condition. Our first IRC in Xi’an has been in operation since March 2021. Equipped with the capacity of warehousing, exhibition, inspection and preparation, the Xi’an IRC is able to hold over 1,000 used cars and to provide services in connection with the vehicle registration and management bureau, providing consumers with a one-stop shopping experience.
We have also started to focus on improving NPS to measure the level of satisfaction for our services by our consumers.
Corporate Structure
We have entered into a series of contractual arrangements with our VIEs and their respective shareholders. These contractual arrangements enable us to:

receive the economic benefits that could potentially be significant to our VIEs in consideration for the services provided by our subsidiaries;

exercise effective control over our VIEs; and

hold an exclusive option to purchase all or part of the equity interests in our VIEs when and to the extent permitted by PRC law.
These contractual agreements include exclusive business cooperation agreements, exclusive option agreement, loan agreements, equity interest pledge agreements and powers of attorney, as the case may be. As of the date of this prospectus, our WFOEs have not received any payment from our VIEs or their subsidiaries under the exclusive business cooperation agreements. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, there was no cash transferred between our VIEs and Uxin Limited or its subsidiaries. For the year ended December 31, 2018 and 2019 and the three months ended March 31, 2020, other than funds paid or received in the ordinary course of business on behalf of our PRC subsidiaries, there was no other cash movement or transfer of funds between our VIEs and Uxin Limited or its subsidiaries. For a summary of the material provisions of the contractual arrangements, please refer to “Item 4. Information on the Company —
 
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C. Organizational Structure — Contractual Arrangements with Our VIEs and their Respective Shareholders” in our Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021. We derived 10.2%, 4.6%, 5.1% and 0.9% of our net revenues from our VIEs and their subsidiaries for the year ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, the three months ended March 31, 2020 and the year ended March 31, 2021, respectively. Yougu (Shanghai) Information Technology Co., Ltd., our WFOE, and Youhan (Shanghai) Information Technology Co., Ltd., the subsidiary of our WFOE, have obtained Value-Added Telecom Service license, or VATS license, to conduct E-commerce in 2015 and 2016, respectively, and have been operating our platform since then. As of the date of the prospectus, we primarily conduct our operations through our subsidiaries.
We do not have any equity interests in our VIEs. However, as a result of contractual arrangements, we have effective control over and are considered the primary beneficiary of these companies, and we have consolidated the financial results of these companies in our consolidated financial statements. If our VIEs or their shareholders fail to perform their respective obligations under the contractual arrangements, we could be limited in our ability to enforce the contractual arrangements that give us effective control over our VIEs. Furthermore, if we are unable to maintain effective control, we would not be able to continue to consolidate the financial results of our VIEs and their subsidiaries in our financial statements. For a detailed description of the risks associated with our corporate structure, please refer to risks disclosed under “Item 3.D. Key Information — Risk Factors — Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure” in our Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, which is incorporated by reference and “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure” in this prospectus.
Holding Company Structure
Uxin Limited is a holding company with no operations of its own. For financial information of Uxin Limited (the parent company), please refer to “Note 32. Condensed Financial Information of the Parent Company” in our Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021. We conduct our operations in China primarily through our subsidiaries and VIEs and their subsidiaries in China. As a result, although other means are available for us to obtain financing at the holding company level, Uxin Limited’s ability to pay dividends to the shareholders and to service any debt it may incur may depend upon dividends paid by our PRC subsidiaries and service fees paid by our PRC VIEs and their subsidiaries. If any of our subsidiaries incurs debt on its own behalf in the future, the instruments governing such debt may restrict its ability to pay dividends to Uxin Limited. In addition, our PRC subsidiaries and VIEs and their subsidiaries are required to make appropriations to certain statutory reserve funds, which are not distributable as cash dividends except in the event of a solvent liquidation of the companies.
Our PRC subsidiaries, being foreign-invested enterprises established in China, are required to make appropriations to certain statutory reserves, namely, a general reserve fund, an enterprise expansion fund, a staff welfare fund and a bonus fund, all of which are appropriated from net profit as reported in their PRC statutory accounts. Each of our PRC subsidiaries is required to allocate at least 10% of its after-tax profits to a general reserve fund until such fund has reached 50% of its respective registered capital. Appropriations to the enterprise expansion fund and staff welfare and bonus funds are at the discretion of the board of directors of the PRC subsidiaries.
Our VIEs and their subsidiaries must make appropriations from their after-tax profits as reported in their PRC statutory accounts to non-distributable reserve funds, namely a statutory surplus fund, a statutory public welfare fund and a discretionary surplus fund. Each of our VIEs and their subsidiaries is required to allocate at least 10% of its after-tax profits to the statutory surplus fund until such fund has reached 50% of its respective registered capital. Appropriations to the statutory public welfare fund and the discretionary surplus fund are at the discretion of our VIEs and their subsidiaries.
Under PRC laws and regulations, our PRC subsidiaries and VIEs and their subsidiaries are subject to certain restrictions with respect to paying dividends or otherwise transferring any of their net assets to us.
Financial Information
The following table sets forth the assets, liabilities, results of operations and cash flows of our VIEs and their subsidiaries taken as a whole. Transactions between our VIEs and their subsidiaries are eliminated for the periods presented.
 
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March 31, 2020
March 31, 2021
RMB
RMB
Cash and cash equivalents
1,852 299
Amounts due from related parties
195,345 207,313
Accounts receivable
2,613 2,202
Other receivables, net
32,578 43,493
Inventory
2,120
Prepaid expense and other current assets
2,545 2,514
Long-term investments
6,065 5,666
Property, equipment and software, net
4,224 3,531
Intangible assets, net
375 313
Total assets
247,717 265,331
Accounts payable
4 4
Amounts due to related parties
779,960 815,459
Other payables and accruals
74,018 65,472
Total liabilities
853,982 880,935
For the year ended December 31,
For the three 
months ended
March 31,
2020
For the fiscal
year ended
March 31,
2021
2018
2019
RMB
RMB
RMB
RMB
Total revenues
416,578 160,626 6,393 6,160
Cost of revenues
(156,093) (46,670) (4,828) (14)
Net (loss)/income
(85,882) (47,672) 44,704 (9,341)
Net cash used in operating activities
(51,713) (45,393) (31,962) (1,825)
Net cash (used in)/generated from investing
activities
(67,516) 3,071 157,405 23
Net cash generated from/(used in) financing activities
81,489 319 (149,528) 249
Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents
(37,740) (42,003) (24,085) (1,553)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the period
105,680 67,940 25,937 1,852
Cash and cash equivalents reclassified as held for sale assets
25,024
Cash and cash equivalents at end of the period
105,680 67,940 913 1,852
Corporate Information
Our principal executive offices are located at 1&3/F, No. 12 Beitucheng East Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100029, People’s Republic of China. Our telephone number at this address is +86 10 5691-6765. Our registered office in the Cayman Islands is located at Maples Corporate Services Limited at P.O. Box 309, Ugland House, Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, Cayman Islands. We have appointed Cogency Global Inc., located at 122 East 42nd Street, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10168 as our agent upon whom process may be served in any action brought against us under the securities laws of the United States in connection with offerings of securities registered by the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part.
The SEC maintains an internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC at www.sec.gov. You can also find information on our website at http://ir.xin.com/. The information contained on our website is not a part of this prospectus.
 
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Recent Regulatory Developments
On July 10, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China, or the CAC, published the Measures for Cybersecurity Review (Revised Draft for Comments), or the Revised Draft, which will replace the current Measures for Cybersecurity Review after it is adopted and becomes effective. The Revised Draft, among others, stipulates that if an operator has personal information of over one million users and intends to be listed in a foreign country, it must be subject to the cybersecurity review. As advised by our PRC legal counsel, the Revised Draft was released for public comment only, and its provisions and anticipated adoption or effective date may be subject to change and thus its interpretation and implementation remain substantially uncertain. The Revised Draft remains unclear on whether the relevant requirements will be applicable to companies that have been listed in the United States and intend to conduct further equity or debt offerings, such as us. We cannot predict the impact of the Revised Draft, if any, at this stage, and we will closely monitor and assess any development in the rule-making process. On July 30, 2021, to ensure the security of critical information and maintain network security, the State Council published the Critical Information Infrastructure Security Protection Regulations in accordance with the Data Security Law of the People’s Republic of China, which will take effect on September 1, 2021. This Regulation emphasizes that operators should take technical protection measures and other necessary measures to respond to cybersecurity incidents, ensure the safe and stable operation of critical information infrastructure, and maintain the integrity, confidentiality and availability of data. As this regulation was recently promulgated and has not yet taken effect, we are currently unable to estimate its specific impact on our business, results of operations and prospects. We cannot assure you that our business operations comply with such regulations and authorities’ requirements in all respects. Any failure or perceived failure by us to comply such regulations may result in governmental investigations or enforcement actions or penalties against us and could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations. See “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Our Business and Industry — We collect, process, store, and use personal information and other data, and any actual or perceived failure to protect such information and data could damage our reputation and brand and harm our business and results of operations.”
Under the current Measures for Cybersecurity Review and other PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations, as well as the Revised Draft, critical information infrastructure operators that intend to purchase internet products and services that affect or may affect national security must be subject to the cybersecurity review. As advised by our PRC legal counsel, the exact scope of “critical information infrastructure operators” under the Revised Draft and the current regulatory regime remains unclear, and the PRC government authorities may have wide discretion in the interpretation and enforcement of these laws. In addition, the Revised Draft also stipulates that any data processor carrying out data processing activities that affect or may affect national security should also be subject to the cybersecurity review. Currently, the Revised Draft has not directly affected our business and operations, but in anticipation of the strengthened implementation of cybersecurity laws and regulations and the continued expansion of our business, we face potential risks if we are deemed as a critical information infrastructure operator under the PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations. In such case, we must fulfill certain obligations as required under the PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations, including, among others, storing personal information and important data collected and produced within the PRC territory during our operations in China, which we have fulfilled in our business, and we may be subject to review when purchasing internet products and services. If a final version of the Revised Draft is adopted, we may be subject to review when conducting data processing activities, and may face challenges in addressing its requirements and make necessary changes to our internal policies and practices in data processing. The Information and Communication Administration of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology issued a notice on August 18, 2021 (the “Notice”), requiring 43 apps, including our app to rectify on non-compliance with data collection and usage regarding users’ contact list and location data. The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology requires us to complete the rectification before August 25. We have refined our data collection and usage policy and submitted a written report within the prescribed time-frame to show rectification we had adopted as required under the Notice.
On July 6, 2021, the relevant PRC government authorities made public the Opinions on Strictly Cracking Down Illegal Securities Activities in Accordance with the Law. These opinions emphasized the need to strengthen the administration over illegal securities activities and the supervision on overseas listings by China-based companies and proposed to take effective measures, such as promoting the construction of
 
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relevant regulatory systems to deal with the risks and incidents faced by China-based overseas-listed companies. As these opinions were recently issued, official guidance and related implementation rules have not been issued yet and the interpretation of these opinions remains unclear at this stage. As such, we cannot assure you that additional requirements relating to approval from the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or the CSRC, or other regulatory authorities or other procedures will not be imposed on us, in connection with this offering or other further offerings of securities. Nor can we assure you that any new rules or regulations promulgated in the future will not impose additional requirements on us. If it is determined in the future that approval from the CSRC or other regulatory authorities or other procedures are required for this offering, it is uncertain whether we can or how long it will take us to obtain such approval or complete such procedures and any such approval or completion could be rescinded. See “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Doing Business in China — Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of Chinese laws and regulations could limit the legal protections available to us.” As of the date of this prospectus, we have not received any inquiry, notice, warning, or sanctions regarding offshore offering from the CSRC or any other PRC government authorities.
 
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RISK FACTORS
Investing in our securities involves risk. Before you decide to buy our securities, you should carefully consider the risks described in our most recent annual report on Form 20-F, which is incorporated herein by reference, as well as the risks that are described in the applicable prospectus supplement and in other documents incorporated by reference into this prospectus. If any of these risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition and results of operations could suffer, and you may lose all or part of your investment.
Please see “Where You Can Find More Information” and “Incorporation of Certain Documents by Reference” for information on where you can find the documents we have filed with or furnished to the SEC and which are incorporated into this prospectus by reference.
Summary of Risk Factors
Below please find a summary of the principal risks we face, organized under relevant headings.
Risks Related to Our Business and Industry
Risks and uncertainties related to our business and industry include, but are not limited to, the following:

If we fail to provide a differentiated and superior customer experience, the size of our customer base and the number of transactions on our platform could decline, and our business would be materially and adversely affected;

Failure to maintain or enhance customer trust in us could damage our reputation, reduce or slowdown the growth of our customer base, which could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations;

Our business, operating results and financial condition have been and may continue to be adversely affected by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic;

We face intense competition, which may lead to loss of market share, reduced service fees and revenue, increased expenses, departures of qualified employees, and disputes with competitors;

We are not profitable and have negative cash flows from operations, which may continue in the future;

If we are unable to effectively manage our growth or implement our business strategies, our business, results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected;

Failure to acquire attractive inventory, whether because of supply, competition, or other factors, may have a material adverse effect on our business, sales, and results of operations;

Failure to expeditiously sell our inventory could have a material adverse effect on our business, sales, and results of operations;

We work with third-party service providers and business partners. Actions of third parties are outside of our control and could materially and adversely affect our reputation, business, financial condition and results of operations;

We rely, in part, on our marketing efforts for customer acquisition and achieving higher level of brand recognition. If we fail to conduct our marketing activities effectively and efficiently, our business could be harmed; and

We collect, process, store and use personal information and other data, and any actual or perceived failure to protect such information and data could damage our reputation and brand and harm our business and results of operations.
 
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Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure
Risks and uncertainties related to our corporate structure include, but are not limited to, the following:

We are a Cayman Islands holding company with no equity ownership in our VIEs and we conduct our operations in China through (i) our PRC subsidiaries and (ii) our VIEs with which we have maintained contractual arrangements. Investors in our Class A ordinary shares or the ADSs thus are not purchasing equity interest in our VIEs in China but instead are purchasing equity interest in a Cayman Islands holding company. If the PRC government deems that our contractual arrangements with our VIEs do not comply with PRC regulatory restrictions on foreign investment in the relevant industries, or if these regulations or the interpretation of existing regulations change in the future, we could be subject to severe penalties or be forced to relinquish our interests in those operations. Our holding company in the Cayman Islands, our VIEs, and investors of our company face uncertainty about potential future actions by the PRC government that could affect the enforceability of the contractual arrangements with our VIEs and, consequently, significantly affect the financial performance of our VIEs and our company as a group;

We rely on contractual arrangements with our VIEs and their respective shareholders to exercise control over our business, which may not be as effective as direct ownership in providing operational control;

Any failure by our VIEs or their shareholders to perform their obligations under our contractual arrangements with them would have a material and adverse effect on our business; and

Our ability to enforce the equity pledge agreements between us and our VIEs’ shareholders may be subject to limitations based on PRC laws and regulations.
Risks Related to Doing Business in China
Risks and uncertainties related to doing business in China include, but are not limited to, the following:

Changes in China’s economic, political or social conditions or government policies could have a material and adverse effect on our business and results of operations;

The approval of the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or CSRC, or other PRC government authorities may be required in connection with our offshore offerings under PRC law, and, if required, we cannot predict whether or for how long we will be able to obtain such approval and, even if we obtain such CSRC approval, the approval could be rescinded. Any failure to obtain or delay in obtaining the CSRC approval for our offshore offerings, or a rescission of such CSRC approval if obtained by us, would subject us to sanctions imposed by the CSRC or other PRC regulatory authorities;

Uncertainties with respect to the PRC legal system could adversely affect us;

Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of Chinese laws and regulations could limit the legal protections available to us;

Our business is susceptible to changes in government policies, including policies on automobile purchases, ownership, taxation, vehicle title transfers, and used car transactions across regions and provinces. Failure to adequately respond to such changes could adversely affect our business;

You may experience difficulties in effecting service of legal process, enforcing foreign judgments or bringing actions in China against us or our management named in the annual report based on foreign laws; and

Our ADSs may be delisted under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act if the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or the PCAOB is unable to inspect auditors who are located in China. The delisting of our ADSs, or the threat of their being delisted, may materially and adversely affect the value of your investment. Additionally, the inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections deprives our investors with the benefits of such inspections.
 
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Risks Related to Our Class A Ordinary Shares and ADSs
Risks and uncertainties related to our Class A ordinary shares and ADSs include, but are not limited to, the following:

The trading price of the ADSs is likely to be volatile, which could result in substantial losses to investors;

Our dual-class share structure with different voting rights will limit your ability to influence corporate matters and could discourage others from pursuing any change of control transactions that holders of our Class A ordinary shares and ADSs may view as beneficial;

The dual-class structure of our ordinary shares may adversely affect the trading market for our ADSs;

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, or if they adversely change their recommendations regarding the ADSs, the market price for the ADSs and trading volume could decline; and

The sale or availability for sale of substantial amounts of the ADSs could adversely affect their market price.
Risks Related to Our Business and Industry
We collect, process, store, and use personal information and other data, and any actual or perceived failure to protect such information and data could damage our reputation and brand and harm our business and results of operations.
We collect, process, store, and use personal information and other data provided by consumers and our business partners. Although we have spent significant resources to protect our user and transaction data against security breaches, our internal control mechanism may not be sufficient and our security measures may be compromised. Any failure or perceived failure to maintain the security of personal and other data that are provided to or collected by us could harm our reputation and brand and may expose us to legal proceedings and potential liabilities, any of which could adversely affect our business and results of operations.
There are numerous laws and regulations regarding privacy and the collection, processing, storing, sharing, disclosing, using and protecting of personal information and other data. Specifically, personally identifiable and other confidential information is increasingly subject to legislation and regulations in numerous domestic and international jurisdictions. The regulatory framework for privacy protection in China and worldwide is currently evolving and is likely to remain uncertain for the foreseeable future. We could be adversely affected if legislation or regulations in China are expanded to require changes in business practices or privacy policies, or if the PRC governmental authorities interpret or implement their legislation or regulations in ways that negatively affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. In November 2016, the Standing Committee of the NPC released the Cyber Security Law, which took effect in June 2017. The Cyber Security Law requires network operators to perform certain functions related to internet security protection and the strengthening of network information management. For instance, under the Cyber Security Law, network operators of key information infrastructure generally shall, during their operations in the PRC, store the personal information and important data collected and produced within the territory of the PRC and their purchase of network products and services that may affect national securities shall be subject to national cybersecurity review. See “Item 4.B. Information on the Company — Business Overview — Regulation — Regulations on Information Security and Privacy Protection” of our annual report on Form 20-F for our fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, originally filed with the SEC on July 30, 2021. We strive to comply with applicable laws, regulations, policies, and legal obligations relating to privacy and data protection, to the extent possible. However, it is possible that these obligations may be interpreted and applied in new or inconsistent ways and may conflict with other rules or our practices, or that new regulations may be enacted. Any failure or perceived failure by us to comply with our privacy policies, privacy-related obligations to consumers or other third parties or other privacy-related legal obligations, or any compromise of security that results in the unauthorized release or transfer of sensitive information, such as personally
 
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identifiable information or other customer data, may result in governmental enforcement actions, litigation or public statements against us by consumer advocacy groups or others and could cause consumers and our business partners to lose trust in us, which could have an adverse effect on our business. Additionally, if third parties that we work with violate applicable laws or our policies, such violations may also put our customers’ information at risk and could in turn harm our reputation, business and results of operations. In addition, the State Administration for Market Regulation and the Standardization Administration jointly issued the new Standard of Information Security Technology — Personal Information Security Specification (GB/T 35273-2020) in March 2020, which replaced the previous standard GB/T 35273-2017 and took effect from October 2020. Pursuant to this standard, personal data controllers refer to entities or persons who are authorized to determine the purposes and methods for using and processing personal information. Such personal data controller should collect information in accordance with the principles of legality, minimization and voluntariness and should also obtain a consent from the information provider. We expect that these areas will receive greater and continued attention and scrutiny from regulators and the public going forward, which could increase our compliance costs and subject us to heightened risks and challenges associated with data security and protection. For the further purposes of regulating data processing activities, safeguarding data security, promoting data development and utilization, protecting the lawful rights and interests of individuals and organizations, and maintaining national sovereignty, security, and development interests, on June 10, 2021, Standing Committee of the PRC National People’s Congress published the Data Security Law of the People’s Republic of China, which will take effect on September 1, 2021. The Data Security Law requires data processing, which includes the collection, storage, use, processing, transmission, provision, publication of data, to be conducted in a legitimate and proper manner. The Data Security Law also introduces a data classification and hierarchical protection system based on the importance of data in economic and social development, and the degree of harm it may cause to national security, public interests, or legitimate rights and interests of individuals or organizations if such data are tampered with, destroyed, leaked, illegally acquired or illegally used. The appropriate level of protection measures is required to be taken for each respective category of data. Moreover, the Data Security Law provides a national security review procedure for those data activities which may affect national security and imposes export restrictions on certain data and information.
On July 10, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China, or the CAC, published the Measures for Cybersecurity Review (Revised Draft for Comments), or the Revised Draft, which will replace the current Measures for Cybersecurity Review after it is adopted and becomes effective. The Revised Draft, among others, stipulates that if an operator has personal information of over one million users and intends to be listed in a foreign country, it must be subject to the cybersecurity review. As advised by our PRC legal counsel, the Revised Draft was released for public comment only, and its provisions and anticipated adoption or effective date may be subject to change and thus its interpretation and implementation remain substantially uncertain. The Revised Draft remains unclear on whether the relevant requirements will be applicable to companies that have been listed in the United States and intend to conduct further equity or debt offerings, such as us. We cannot predict the impact of the Revised Draft, if any, at this stage, and we will closely monitor and assess any development in the rule-making process. On July 30, 2021, to ensure the security of critical information and maintain network security, the State Council published the Critical Information Infrastructure Security Protection Regulations in accordance with the Data Security Law of the People’s Republic of China, which will take effect on September 1, 2021. This Regulation emphasizes that operators should take technical protection measures and other necessary measures to respond to cybersecurity incidents, ensure the safe and stable operation of critical information infrastructure, and maintain the integrity, confidentiality and availability of data. As this regulation was recently promulgated and has not yet taken effect, we are currently unable to estimate its specific impact on our business, results of operations and prospects. We cannot assure you that our business operations comply with such regulations and authorities’ requirements in all respects. Any failure or perceived failure by us to comply such regulations may result in governmental investigations or enforcement actions or penalties against us and could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
Under the current Measures for Cybersecurity Review and other PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations, as well as the Revised Draft, critical information infrastructure operators that intend to purchase internet products and services that affect or may affect national security must be subject to the cybersecurity review. As advised by our PRC legal counsel, the exact scope of “critical information infrastructure operators” under the Revised Draft and the current regulatory regime remains unclear, and
 
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the PRC government authorities may have wide discretion in the interpretation and enforcement of these laws. In addition, the Revised Draft also stipulates that any data processor carrying out data processing activities that affect or may affect national security should also be subject to the cybersecurity review. Currently, the Revised Draft has not directly affected our business and operations, but in anticipation of the strengthened implementation of cybersecurity laws and regulations and the continued expansion of our business, we face potential risks if we are deemed as a critical information infrastructure operator under the PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations. In such case, we must fulfill certain obligations as required under the PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations, including, among others, storing personal information and important data collected and produced within the PRC territory during our operations in China, which we have fulfilled in our business, and we may be subject to review when purchasing internet products and services. If a final version of the Revised Draft is adopted, we may be subject to review when conducting data processing activities, and may face challenges in addressing its requirements and make necessary changes to our internal policies and practices in data processing. Based on the foregoing, our PRC legal counsel do not expect that, as of the date of this prospectus, the current applicable PRC laws on cybersecurity would have a material adverse impact on our business.
Despite our efforts to comply with applicable laws, regulations and other obligations relating to privacy, data protection and information security, we cannot assure you that we will be compliant with such new regulations in all respects. The Information and Communication Administration of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology issued a notice on August 18, 2021 (the “Notice”), requiring 43 apps, including our app to rectify on non-compliance with data collection and usage regarding users’ contact list and location data. The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology requires us to complete the rectification before August 25. We have refined our data collection and usage policy and submitted a written report within the prescribed time-frame to show rectification we had adopted as required under the Notice. As laws and regulations in China on the protection of privacy and data are constantly evolving, complying with new laws and regulations could cause us to incur substantial costs or require us to change our business practices in a manner materially adverse to our business. Any failure to comply with such laws and regulations may result in the suspension of our relevant businesses, the take-down of our operating applications, or subject us to other penalties, which may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
In addition to laws and regulations, other applicable rules regarding privacy and privacy advocacy, industry associations or other private parties may propose new and different privacy standards. Because the interpretation and application of privacy and data protection laws and privacy standards are still uncertain, it is possible that these laws or privacy standards may be interpreted and applied in a manner that is inconsistent with our practices. Any inability to adequately address privacy concerns, even if unfounded, or to comply with applicable privacy or data protection laws, regulations and privacy standards, could result in additional cost and liability to us, damage our reputation, inhibit the use of our platform and harm our business.
Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure
If the PRC government finds that the agreements that establish the structure for operating some of our operations in China do not comply with PRC regulations relating to the relevant industries, or if these regulations or the interpretation of existing regulations change in the future, we could be subject to penalties or be forced to relinquish our interests in those operations.
We are a Cayman Islands exempted company and our PRC subsidiaries are currently considered foreign-invested enterprises. Currently, our main websites are operated and our main business are run by our wholly-foreign-owned enterprises, or WFOEs, while our VIEs hold the title of a number of intellectual properties, operate certain of our websites and conduct certain of our business. Our WFOEs have entered into a series of contractual arrangements with our VIEs and their respective shareholders, respectively, which enable us to (i) exercise effective control over our VIEs, (ii) receive substantially all of the economic benefits of our VIEs, and (iii) have an exclusive option to purchase all or part of the equity interests and assets in our VIEs when and to the extent permitted by PRC law. As a result of these contractual arrangements, we have control over and are the primary beneficiary of our VIEs and hence consolidate their financial results under U.S. GAAP. See “Item 4. Information on the Company — C. Organizational Structure” of our annual report on
 
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Form 20-F for our fiscal year ended March 31, 2021 for further details. Other than investment in VIEs and our subsidiaries, no other significant assets or liabilities are held or borne by our WFOEs.
In the opinion of Beijing Docvit Law Firm, our PRC legal counsel, (i) the ownership structures of our VIEs in China and our WFOEs that have entered into contractual arrangements with the VIEs, comply with all existing PRC laws and regulations; and (ii) the contractual arrangements between our WFOEs, the VIEs and their respective shareholders governed by PRC law are valid, binding and enforceable, and will not result in any violation of PRC laws or regulations currently in effect. However, our PRC legal counsel has also advised us that there is substantial uncertainty regarding the interpretation and application of current and future PRC laws, regulations and rules; accordingly, the PRC regulatory authorities may take a view that is contrary to the opinion of our PRC legal counsel. It is uncertain whether any new PRC laws or regulations relating to variable interest entity structures will be adopted or if adopted, what they would provide. If we or any of our VIEs are found to be in violation of any existing or future PRC laws or regulations, or fail to obtain or maintain any of the required permits or approvals, the relevant PRC regulatory authorities would have broad discretion to take action in dealing with such violations or failures, including:

revoking the business licenses and other licenses and permits of our VIEs;

discontinuing or placing restrictions or onerous conditions on our operation through any transactions between our WFOEs and our VIEs;

imposing fines, confiscating the income from our WFOEs or our VIEs, or imposing other requirements with which we or our VIEs may not be able to comply;

requiring us to restructure our ownership structure or operations, including terminating the contractual arrangements with our VIEs and deregistering the equity pledges of our VIEs, which in turn would affect our ability to consolidate, derive economic interests from, or exert effective control over our VIEs;

restricting or prohibiting our use of the proceeds of our initial public offering and the concurrent

taking other regulatory or enforcement actions that could be harmful to our business.
The imposition of any of these penalties would result in adverse effect on our ability to conduct certain part of our business. In addition, it is unclear what impact the PRC government actions would have on us and on our ability to consolidate the financial results of our VIEs in our consolidated financial statements, if the PRC government authorities were to find our legal structure and contractual arrangements to be in violation of PRC laws and regulations. If the imposition of any of these government actions causes us to lose our right to direct the activities of our VIEs or our right to receive substantially all the economic benefits and residual returns from our VIEs and we are not able to restructure our ownership structure and operations in a satisfactory manner, we would no longer be able to consolidate the financial results of our VIEs in our consolidated financial statements. Either of these results, or any other significant penalties that might be imposed on us in this event, would have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.
We rely on contractual arrangements with our VIEs and their respective shareholders to exercise control over our business, which may not be as effective as direct ownership in providing operational control.
We have entered into contractual arrangements with our VIEs and their shareholders to conduct certain aspects of our businesses. These contractual arrangements may not be as effective as direct ownership in providing us with control over our VIEs. For example, our VIEs and their shareholders could breach their contractual arrangements with us by, among other things, failing to conduct its operations in an acceptable manner or taking other actions that are detrimental to our interests.
If we had direct ownership of our VIEs, we would be able to exercise our rights as a shareholder to effect changes in the board of directors of our VIEs, which in turn could implement changes, subject to any applicable fiduciary obligations, at the management and operational level. However, under the current contractual arrangements, we rely on the performance by our VIEs and their respective shareholders of their obligations under the contracts to exercise control over our VIEs. However, the shareholders of our consolidated VIEs may not act in the best interests of our company or may not perform their obligations
 
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under these contracts. Such risks exist throughout the period in which we intend to operate certain portions of our business through the contractual arrangements with our VIEs. If any disputes relating to these contracts remain unresolved, we will have to enforce our rights under these contracts through the operations of PRC law and arbitration, litigation and other legal proceedings and therefore will be subject to uncertainties in the PRC legal system. See “— Any failure by our VIEs or their shareholders to perform their obligations under our contractual arrangements with them would have a material and adverse effect on our business.” Therefore, our contractual arrangements with our VIEs may not be as effective in ensuring our control over the relevant portion of our business operations as direct ownership would be.
Any failure by our VIEs or their shareholders to perform their obligations under our contractual arrangements with them would have a material and adverse effect on our business.
We refer to the shareholders of each of our VIEs as its nominee shareholders because although they remain the holders of equity interests on record in each of our VIEs, pursuant to the terms of the relevant power of attorney, each such shareholder has irrevocably authorized our WFOEs to exercise his, her or its rights as a shareholder of the relevant VIE.
If our VIEs or their shareholders fail to perform their respective obligations under the contractual arrangements, we may have to incur additional costs and expend additional resources to enforce such arrangements. We may also have to rely on legal remedies under PRC law, including seeking specific performance or injunctive relief, and claiming damages, which we cannot assure will be effective under PRC law. For example, if the shareholders of our VIEs refuse to transfer their equity interest in our VIEs to us or our designee if we exercise the purchase option pursuant to these contractual arrangements, or if they otherwise act in bad faith toward us, then we may have to take legal actions to compel them to perform their contractual obligations.
All of these contractual arrangements are governed by and interpreted in accordance with PRC law, and disputes arising from these contractual arrangements between us and our variable interest entity will be resolved through arbitration in China. These disputes do not include claims arising under the United States federal securities law and thus the arbitration provisions do not prevent our shareholders from pursuing claims under the United Sates federal securities law. The legal system in the PRC is not as developed as in some other jurisdictions, such as the United States. As a result, uncertainties in the PRC legal system could limit our ability to enforce these contractual arrangements. See “— Risks Related to Doing Business in China — Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of Chinese laws and regulations could limit the legal protections available to us.” Meanwhile, there are very few precedents and little formal guidance as to how contractual arrangements in the context of a VIE should be interpreted or enforced under PRC law. There remain significant uncertainties regarding the ultimate outcome of such arbitration should legal action become necessary. In addition, under PRC law, rulings by arbitrators are final, parties cannot appeal the arbitration results in courts, and if the losing parties fail to carry out the arbitration awards within a prescribed time limit, the prevailing parties may only enforce the arbitration awards in PRC courts through arbitration award recognition proceedings, which would require additional expenses and delay. In the event we are unable to enforce these contractual arrangements, or if we suffer significant delays or other obstacles in the process of enforcing these contractual arrangements, we may not be able to exert effective control over our VIEs, and our ability to conduct our business may be negatively affected.
Risks Related to Doing Business in China
Uncertainties with respect to the PRC legal system could adversely affect us.
We conduct our business primarily through our subsidiaries and VIEs and their subsidiaries in China. Our operations in China are governed by PRC laws and regulations. Our subsidiaries are generally subject to laws and regulations applicable to foreign investments in China. The PRC legal system is based on written statutes. Prior court decisions may be cited for reference but have limited precedential value.
PRC laws and regulations have significantly enhanced the protections afforded to various forms of foreign investments in China for the past decades. However, China has not developed a fully integrated legal system and recently enacted laws and regulations may not sufficiently cover all aspects of economic activities in China. In particular, because these laws and regulations are relatively new, and because of the
 
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limited volume of published decisions and their nonbinding nature, the interpretation and enforcement of these laws and regulations involve uncertainties.
Furthermore, the PRC legal system is based in part on government policies and internal rules, some of which are not published on a timely basis or at all. As a result, we may not be aware of our potential violation of these policies and rules. In addition, any administrative and court proceedings in China may be protracted and result in substantial costs and diversion of resources and management attention.
PRC government has significant oversight over the conduct of our business and it has recently indicated an intent to exert more oversight over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers. Any such action could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless.
Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of Chinese laws and regulations could limit the legal protections available to us.
The PRC legal system is based on written statutes and prior court decisions have limited value as precedents. Since these laws and regulations are relatively new and the PRC legal system continues to rapidly evolve, the interpretations of many laws, regulations and rules are not always consistent and enforcement of these laws, regulations and rules involves uncertainties.
In particular, PRC laws and regulations concerning the used car e-commerce industry are developing and evolving. Although we have taken measures to comply with the laws and regulations that are applicable to our business operations and avoid conducting any activities that may be deemed as illegal under the current applicable laws and regulations, the PRC government authority may promulgate new laws and regulations regulating our industry and amend the existing laws and regulations in the future. See “— Risks Related to Our Business and Industry — Failure to obtain certain filings, approvals, licenses, permits and certificates for our business operations may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations” of our annual report on Form 20-F for our fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, originally filed with the SEC on July 30, 2021. We cannot assure you that our practices would not be deemed to violate any PRC laws or regulations. Moreover, developments in the used car service industry and online used car transaction industry may lead to changes in PRC laws, regulations and policies or in the interpretation and application of existing laws, regulations and policies that may limit or restrict online used car dealers like us, which could materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations.
In addition, our PRC subsidiaries are subject to laws and regulations applicable to foreign investment in China. The Foreign Investment Law, which took effect on March 15, 2019, and its current implementation and interpretation rules, which came into effect on January 1, 2020, do not explicitly clarify whether VIEs that are controlled through contractual arrangements would be deemed as foreign-invested enterprises if they are ultimately “controlled” by foreign investors. However, it has a catch-all provision under the definition of “foreign investment” that includes investments made by foreign investors in China through other means as provided by laws, administrative regulations, or the State Council. If our control over its VIEs through contractual arrangements is deemed as a foreign investment in the future, and any business of our VIEs is “restricted” or “prohibited” from foreign investment under the “negative list” effective at the time, we may be deemed to be in violation of the Foreign Investment Law, the contractual arrangements that allow us to have control over our VIEs may be deemed as invalid and illegal.
From time to time, we may have to resort to administrative and court proceedings to enforce our legal rights. However, since PRC administrative and court authorities have significant discretion in interpreting and implementing statutory and contractual terms, it may be more difficult to evaluate the outcome of administrative and court proceedings and the level of legal protection we enjoy than in more developed legal systems. Furthermore, the PRC legal system is based in part on government policies and internal rules (some of which are not published in a timely manner or at all) that may have retroactive effect. As a result, we may not be aware of our violation of these policies and rules until sometime after the violation. Such uncertainties, including uncertainty over the scope and effect of our contractual, property (including intellectual property) and procedural rights, could materially and adversely affect our business and impede our ability to continue our operations. These and other similar legal and regulatory developments could lead
 
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to legal and economic uncertainty, affect how we design, market and sell solutions, how we operate our business, how our customers process and share data, how we process and use data, and how we transfer personal data from one jurisdiction to another, which could negatively impact demand for our solutions. We may incur substantial costs to comply with such laws and regulations, to meet the demands of our customers relating to their own compliance with applicable laws and regulations, and to establish and maintain internal compliance policies.
On July 6, 2021, the relevant PRC government authorities made public the Opinions on Strictly Cracking Down Illegal Securities Activities in Accordance with the Law. These opinions emphasized the need to strengthen the administration over illegal securities activities and the supervision on overseas listings by China-based companies and proposed to take effective measures, such as promoting the construction of relevant regulatory systems to deal with the risks and incidents faced by China-based overseas-listed companies. As these opinions were recently issued, official guidance and related implementation rules have not been issued yet and the interpretation of these opinions remains unclear at this stage. As such, we cannot assure you that additional requirements relating to approval from the CSRC or other regulatory authorities or other procedures will not be imposed on us, in connection with this offering or other further offerings of securities. Nor can we assure you that any new rules or regulations promulgated in the future will not impose additional requirements on us. If it is determined in the future that approval from the CSRC or other regulatory authorities or other procedures are required for this offering, it is uncertain whether we can or how long it will take us to obtain such approval or complete such procedures and any such approval or completion could be rescinded. As of the date of this prospectus, we have not received any inquiry, notice, warning, or sanctions regarding offshore offering from the CSRC or any other PRC government authorities. Based on the foregoing and currently effective PRC laws, our PRC counsel are of the view that, as of the date of this prospectus, these opinions do not have a material adverse impact on our business.
The PRC anti-monopoly enforcement agencies have in recent years strengthened enforcement under the PRC Anti-monopoly Law. In March 2018, the State Administration for Market Regulation , or the SAMR, was formed as a new governmental agency to take over, among other things, the anti-monopoly enforcement functions from the relevant departments under the Ministry of Commerce of the PRC, or the MOFCOM, the National Development Reform Committee, or the NDRC, and the State Administration for Industry and Commerce, or the SAIC, respectively. Since its inception, the SAMR has continued to strengthen anti-monopoly enforcement. In December 2018, the SAMR issued the Notice on Anti-monopoly Enforcement Authorization, which grants authorities to its province-level branches to conduct anti-monopoly enforcement within their respective jurisdictions. In September 2020, the SAMR issued Anti-monopoly Compliance Guideline for Operators, which requires, under the PRC Anti-monopoly Law, operators to establish anti-monopoly compliance management systems to prevent anti-monopoly compliance risks. On February 7, 2021, the Antimonopoly Commission of the State Council officially promulgated the Anti-Monopoly Guidelines for Internet Platforms. Pursuant to an official interpretation from the Anti-monopoly Commission of the State Council, the Anti-Monopoly Guidelines for Internet Platforms mainly covers five aspects, including general provisions, monopoly agreements, abusing market dominance, concentration of undertakings, and abusing of administrative powers eliminating or restricting competition. The Anti-Monopoly Guidelines for Internet Platforms prohibits certain monopolistic acts of internet platforms so as to protect market competition and safeguard interests of users and undertakings participating in internet platform economy, including without limitation, prohibiting companies with dominant position from abusing their market dominance (such as discriminating customers in terms of pricing and other transactional conditions using big data and analytics, coercing counterparties into exclusivity arrangements, using technology means to block competitors’ interface, favorable positioning in search results of goods displays, using bundle services to sell services or products, compulsory collection of unnecessary user data). In addition, the Anti-Monopoly Guidelines for Internet Platforms also reinforces antitrust merger review for internet platform related transactions to safeguard market competition. In practice, the PRC governmental authority also strengthens the supervision of monopoly and other unfair competition acts, and requests to establish a new order of the platform economy. In April 2021, the SAMR, together with certain other PRC government authorities convened an administrative guidance meeting, focusing on unfair competition acts in community group buying, self-inspection and rectification by major internet companies of possible violations of anti-monopoly, anti-unfair competition, tax and other related laws and regulations, and requesting such companies to comply with relevant laws and regulations strictly and be subject to public supervision. In addition, many internet companies, including the over 30 companies which attended such
 
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administrative guidance meeting, are required to conduct a comprehensive self-inspection and make necessary rectification accordingly. The SAMR has stated it will organize and conduct inspections on the companies’ rectification results. If the companies are found to conduct illegal activities, more severe penalties are expected to be imposed on them in accordance with the laws. As the Anti-Monopoly Guidelines for Internet Platforms was newly promulgated, we are unable to estimate its specific impact on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. We cannot assure you that our business operations comply with such regulations and authorities’ requirements in all respects. Any failure or perceived failure by us to comply such regulations and authorities’ requirements may result in governmental investigations or enforcement actions, lawsuits or claims against us and could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our ADSs may be delisted under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act if the PCAOB is unable to inspect auditors who are located in China. The delisting of our ADSs, or the threat of their being delisted, may materially and adversely affect the value of your investment. Additionally, the inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections deprives our investors with the benefits of such inspections.
The Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, or the HFCA Act, was enacted on December 18, 2020. The HFCA Act states if the SEC determines that we have filed audit reports issued by a registered public accounting firm that has not been subject to inspection by the PCAOB for three consecutive years beginning in 2021, the SEC shall prohibit our shares or ADSs from being traded on a national securities exchange or in the over the counter trading market in the U.S.
Our auditor, the independent registered public accounting firm that issues the audit report included elsewhere in this annual report, as an auditor of companies that are traded publicly in the United States and a firm registered with the PCAOB, is subject to laws in the United States pursuant to which the PCAOB conducts regular inspections to assess its compliance with the applicable professional standards. Since our auditor is located in China, a jurisdiction where the PCAOB has been unable to conduct inspections without the approval of the Chinese authorities, our auditor is currently not inspected by the PCAOB.
On March 24, 2021, the SEC adopted interim final rules relating to the implementation of certain disclosure and documentation requirements of the HFCA Act. We will be required to comply with these rules if the SEC identifies us as having a “non-inspection” year under a process to be subsequently established by the SEC. The SEC is assessing how to implement other requirements of the HFCA Act, including the listing and trading prohibition requirements described above.
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